Grantmaking for Community Impact Project: Impact Directory

This directory contains advocacy and community organizing impacts that were achieved by 110 organizations in 13 states over a five-year period and verified by NCRP researchers. It is a compilation of data reported in each of seven Strengthening Democracy, Increasing Opportunities reports, in Appendices B (monetized impacts) and Appendices C (non-monetized impacts). This list can be sorted in several ways by double-clicking on the up-down arrow to the right of a column header:

  1. Numerically by dollar value of the impact. Please note that many impacts could not be monetized but are equally significant if not more so.
  2. By issue area, according to the legend below. Note that some impacts were coded under more than one issue area.
  3. Alphabetically by state, type of beneficiary, and organizations involved in achieving the impact.


Tips:

Because multiple organizations were frequently involved in one impact, and many impacts had more than one beneficiary, you can use "Control F" on your keyboard to do a word, phrase or name search throughout all or part of the database.

To sort or search the entire list, select "All" entries in the pull down menu above the list.

If the number of beneficiaries was known, the information is reported in the Description of Impact.

Note that the methodology does not warrant comparisons across states; also, the number of organizations studied in each state varies from as few as three to as many as 15.

  • ES = Economic Security
  • CD = Housing, Homelessness, Community Development
  • EJ = Environmental Justice, Land Use and Transportation
  • ED = Education (pre-K to college) and Youth
  • H = Health
  • CR = Civil and Human Rights
StateDescription of ImpactDollar Value (if known)ESCDEJEDHCRType of BeneficiariesOrganizations Involved
AL Newly formed Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice blocked anti-immigrant legislation in the statehouse, including a 2008 bill requiring drivers’ license tests to be given only in English, and the Alabama Taxpayer and Citizen Protection Act of 2008. This act would have made it illegal for an American citizen to protect or harbor an “illegal alien,” denied tuition, scholarships and financial aid to “illegal aliens,” and expanded the instances in which law enforcement agents, state agencies and employers are required to verify immigration status. Subsequently, a strict anti-immigrant law did pass.             X Immigrants Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama, Alabama Appleseed, Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice
AL Succeeded in ending life without parole sentences for non-violent offenders. This will save the state more than $15,000 per year to house the 300 inmates eligible for parole, which totals more than $113 million over 25 years. $113,385,000           X Incarcerated individuals Equal Justice Initiative
AL Systematically challenged prosecutors to address racial discrimination in jury selection; 100 individuals' death penalty sentences have been overturned after proving intentional racial bias in jury selection.             X Incarcerated individuals Equal Justice Initiative, NAACP, Southern Christian Leadership Conference, local groups
AL Successful campaign of legal advocacy resulted in federal Supreme Court ruling that banned life without parole (“death in prison”) sentencing for children, benefiting 2500 juveniles.             X Incarcerated youth Equal Justice Initiative, Campaign for Fair Sentencing of Youth, dozens of youth organizations, 16 groups that filed amicus briefs, including the American Bar Association, American Psychological Association, National Association of Student Councils, Amnesty International
AL Negotiated a compromise in setting standards in the Baby Douglass Legislation, which prevents child care providers from giving any type of medication to children in their care. Educated child care providers about how to apply new standards. Benefits 10,000 child care workers and the children in their care.   X       X   Low-income children and youth; childcare providers Federation of Child Care Centers of Alabama
AL 1% sales tax approved to get a new high school built in Sumter County, Alabama, benefiting 3,000 junior high and high school students in rural area $600,000       X     Low-income children and youth; rural residents Greene Sumter Enterprise Community, The City of York, Town of Epes, Town of Gainesville, Town of Emelle, Sumter County Commission – all within Sumter County
AL Conducted an analysis of Mobile’s impediments to Fair Housing Choice, made the city aware of its compliance to HUD’s requirements, and provided guidance for remedying the city’s infractions to address areas in which fair housing access was impeded or not in step with legal regulations. Benefits all 193,000 residents of Mobile.     X         Low-income community residents Center for Fair Housing
AL Prevented City of Mobile from blocking the development of 19 new affordable single family housing units by the Mobile Housing Authority next to a middle/upper class neighborhood. Compelled the city council to approve zoning so that the $3 million development could be built. $3,012,000   X         Low-income community residents Fair Housing Center, Mobile Housing Authority
AL Partnered with other community institutions to promote housing opportunities in Greene and Sumter Counties; the City of Eutaw completed infrastructure and sidewalks of 33-unit single family housing development called Rosie L. Carpenter Haven.     X         Low-income community residents Greene Sumter Enterprise Community, Black Belt Action Commission, PBLA Housing Development Corp, Sumter County BOE (Board of Education) Material Center, Alabama Housing Finance Authority, Community Service Programs of West Alabama
AL Increased court advocacy for Latina victims of domestic violence by expanding access to sole bilingual court advocate in the state. Got judges to stagger dockets and courts to provide a report within 48 hours if a Latino person is brought to court. These changes make it more likely that victims will bring their abuser to court, benefiting 200 victims of domestic violence.             X Victims of domestic violence Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama, YWCA (Young Women's Christian Association)
AR Fought against state anti-adoption initiative, which was enacted in 2008 but overturned in courts in 2010. Benefits 6,000 same-sex couples in Arkansas.             X LGBTQ individuals Center for Artistic Revolution, ACLU, Just Communities of Central Arkansas, Arkansas Citizens First Congress, Stonewall Democrats
AR Forced the removal of a Midland School District school board vice president, who was advocating for gay youth to kill themselves and was discriminating against gay youth. Benefits all 250 residents of Pleasant Plains.         X   X LGBTQ youth Center for Artistic Revolution, Northwest Center for Equality, Unitarian Church, Human Rights Campaign
AR Succeeded in winning and maintaining state funding for Arkansas Better Chance Program to expand pre-K care services throughout the state, resulting in increases of at least $280 million from 2005-2010. Overall, annual pre-k funding is now more than $100 million higher than 2003 levels. Benefits 35,000 3- and 4-year-olds. $280,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Invest Early Coalition, individual members of Kids Count, State Representative LeRoy Dangeau, Senator Jim Argue
AR Advocated to create Children’s Mental Health Commission in Arkansas in 2007 and secured community based, wraparound services not paid for by Medicaid. Benefits up to 60,000 children in the state’s mental health system.           X   Low-income children and youth Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Department of Human Services, Arkansas First Lady
AR Won a series of new policies proven to increase opportunities to learn and close the education achievement gap between higher and lower-income children and white and minority children. In addition to pre-K funding, policies include: strengthened the Achievement Gap Commission via Act 1314 (adding parents and low-income representatives, expanding its duties and requiring annual reports to the legislature); won Early Intervention and Underperforming School Bill; increased transparency of funding for programs to close the achievement gap; expanded access to school performance and improvement data. Benefits more than 280,000 low-income students and students of color.         X     Low-income children and youth Arkansas Public Policy Panel, Arkansas Education Association, Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Arkansas Citizens First Congress
AR During the last three biennial legislative sessions, successfully advocated for necessary funding to allow isolated rural schools and districts to operate, ensuring that more than $48 million was allocated over five years. Benefits 9,800 low-income students at 28 schools. $48,480,000       X     Low-income children and youth; rural residents Rural Community Alliance, Arkansas Rural Educators Association, Arkansas African American Education Association
AR Defeated a school consolidation bill that would have assigned only one school district for every county in the state (no matter how big the school population was). Benefits students in 240 rural school districts.         X     Low-income children and youth; rural residents Rural Community Alliance, Arkansas Rural Education Association, Arkansas African American Administrators Association
AR Secured legislation that changed the timeline for the Department of Education to notify school districts when they are considered as “fiscally distressed.” Benefits all 468,066 K-12 students.         X     Low-income children and youth; rural residents Rural Community Alliance
AR Won reduction of grocery tax to 3%, exemption of families below poverty line from state income taxes, and lower income taxes for families up to 125% of poverty. These measures saved 183,000 low-income taxpayers $105 million in 2008 and continued to provide them savings in future years. All 2,889,450 Arkansas residents enjoy the grocery tax cut. $105,000,000 X           Low-income community residents Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Arkansas Public Policy Panel, Arkansas Citizens First Congress, KidsCount Coalition, Southern Good Faith Fund, State Representative Lindsley Smith
AR Fought payday lending and won crackdown on payday lenders by state attorney general in 2008 and Arkansas Supreme Court ruling that the former Check Cashers Act violated the state constitution. The savings to thousands of borrowers is more than $45.7 million per year, projected for four years. $183,125,916 X           Low-income community residents Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Center for Responsible Lending, AARP, military groups, the Family Council, credit unions, ACORN, Southern Good Faith Fund, Cooperative Extension Agents, credit counselors, Federal Reserve Bank
AR Helped more than 114 workers recover $356,941 in back wages, worker compensation claims, and EEOC settlements. $356,941 X           Low-wage workers Northwest Arkansas Workers’ Justice Center, Department of Labor, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
AR Secured state minimum wage increase from $5.15 to $6.25 per hour. 127,000 workers have garnered 209 million per year in added wages over six years. $1,257,300,000 X           Low-wage workers Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, Give Arkansas a Raise Now Coalition of 20 religious, union, poverty action and civil rights groups
AR Changed state labor statute of limitations to increase wage level for wage theft cases, so the state now investigates wage theft cases in which up to $2,000 is owed (up from $1,000). This allows more workers to go through the state to seek redress. At least 103 workers have benefited to date. $152,448 X           Low-wage workers Northwest Arkansas Workers’ Justice Center, State Representative Lindsley Smith, state Department of Labor, Interfaith Worker Justice, Unions, Northwest Arkansas Labor Council, Homebuilders Association
AR Secured multiple commitments from mayor of Fayetteville, including creation of Mayor’s Task Force on Wage Theft, assignment of police officer to investigate wage theft crimes and creation of hotline to report wage theft.   X           Low-wage workers Northwest Arkansas Workers’ Justice Center; Lioneld Jordan, Fayetteville Mayor; labor allies and attorneys, business attorneys, and other members of the Wage Theft Ordinance Committee; St. Joseph’s Catholic Church; St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
AR Assisted 800 workers in a Bentonville poultry processing plant to get their employer to provide safety equipment.   X           Low-wage workers Northwest Arkansas Workers’ Justice Center
AR Got rid of the American Indian ritual and mascots at Arkansas State University.             X Native Americans Center for Artistic Revolution
AR Creation of Minority HIV/AIDS Taskforce, policy and research recommendations and expansion of access to prevention and treatment services. Garnered one-time state funding of $900,000 to Minority Health Commission. Benefits 679,000 rural people of color. $900,000         X   People of color; rural residents Arkansas Public Policy Panel, Future Builders, Inc., Arkansas Citizens First Congress
AR Successfully advocated for money in the state budget for rural services in communities of less than 1,000, garnering more than $5.5 million over five years. Benefits thousands of rural residents. $5,580,098 X           Rural residents Rural Community Alliance, Director of Rural Services
AR Creation of Arkansas’ first Department of Agriculture. Benefits 45,000 rural family farmers.   X   X       Rural residents Arkansas Public Policy Panel, Arkansas Farm Community Alliance, Arkansas Citizens First Congress
AR Helped Arkansas form a Global Warming Commission and enact new policies based on its recommendations, including the Sustainable Energy Efficient Program to reduce energy use in all existing state buildings by 20% from 2008 levels by 2014, and by 30% by 2017. Estimated taxpayer savings are $20 million by 2014; $30 million by 2017. $20,000,000     X       Low-income community residents Arkansas Public Policy Panel, OMNI Center for Peace, Justice & Ecology; Arkansas Citizens First Congress
CA Won settlement of police brutality case stemming from violent dispersal of peaceful marchers at immigrant rights rally in MacArthur Park in May 2007. Resulted in payment to victims as well as new police oversight mechanisms. $13,000,000           X Immigrants Multi-Ethnic Immigrant Workers Organizing Network (MIWON), including KIWA (Koreatown Immigrant Workers Alliance), CHIRLA (Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles), Institute of Popular Education of Southern California, Garment Worker Center, Pilipino Worker’s Center
CA Engaged in legal advocacy and organized workers arrested during a raid at a Micro Solutions workplace that affected more than 350 workers. At least four cases have been dismissed, supporting the contention that Immigration Control & Enforcement (ICE) used illegal tactics. These cases have resulted in ICE refraining from such tactics and reducing workplace raids.             X Immigrants Coalition for Humane Immigrants’ Rights of Los Angeles, Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, National Immigration Law Center, Central American Resource Center, ACLU of Southern California, National Lawyers Guild, the American Immigration Lawyers’ Association
CA Curbed local police role in federal immigration enforcement in two separate campaigns, (1) limiting terms of L.A. County agreement with Immigration Control and Enforcement (ICE) and (2) protecting City of L.A. Police Department Special Order 40 that prohibits officers to inquire about immigration status in routine matters.             X Immigrants South Asian Network (SAN), CHIRLA (Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles), ACLU of Southern California, Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF)
CA Won language-based consumer fraud case on behalf of Korean customers who were defrauded. Favorably settled lawsuit that forced a large cemetery in L.A. County to change its policies and practices. Benefits all consumers with limited English proficiency.             X Immigrants APALC (Asian Pacific American Legal Center)
CA Helped L.A. County Board of Supervisors and the L.A. County Department of Health Services agree to provide full-time interpreters to serve public hospitals where most lower-income immigrants receive health care.           X X Immigrants APALC (Asian Pacific American Legal Center)
CA Successfully fought state budget cuts to health and welfare programs serving thousands of immigrants   X       X X Immigrants APALC (Asian Pacific American Legal Center), CHIRLA (Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles), California Immigrant Policy Center
CA Won two-year pilot Workforce Development program for ex-offenders, helping 43 individuals reintegrate and obtain jobs and providing subsidies to employers that hire ex-offenders. $1,200,000 X           Incarcerated-formerly individuals L.A. Metropolitan Churches
CA Prevented state funding cuts to the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP), benefiting more than 31,000 lower-income people with HIV/AIDS. $7,000,000         X   Individuals with HIV/AIDS The California HIV Alliance, including L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center, San Francisco AIDS Foundation, Bienestar, Project Inform, AIDS Healthcare Foundation, AIDS Project Los Angeles, AIDS Services Foundation of Orange County, and Sacramento CARES (The Center for AIDS Research, Education & Services)
CA State funded $11 million highly successful public education campaign regarding harms of crystal methamphetamine, targeted to young gay men. $11,000,000         X   LGBTQ individuals L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center, California HIV Alliance
CA Held entertainment venues and promotional companies accountable for the booking of reggae entertainers who have made a living from music and lyrics that advocate harassment, violence and murder of LGBTQ people. Won cancellation of concerts in Los Angeles and nationally by the clubs and promoters of these performers.             X LGBTQ individuals L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center, National Black Justice Coalition, Stop Murder Music Campaign (UK)
CA Won new state funding streams for victims of same-sex domestic violence. $700,000           X LGBTQ individuals; victims of domestic violence L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center, Community United Against Violence, Equality California, the legislative LGBT caucus, and the California Partnership Against Domestic Violence
CA Mobilized public agencies to fill gaps in transition services and worked with the Department of Children and Family Services to develop a new program to provide extensive services to LGBTQ youth in the foster care program in Los Angeles County.         X   X LGBTQ youth L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center
CA Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) passed A-G resolution guaranteeing all high school students access to college-preparatory curriculum. May expand access to up to 150,000 students.         X     Low-income children and youth Community Coalition, InnerCity Struggle, Alliance for a Better Community, Families in Schools, United Way of Greater Los Angeles, Communities for Educational Equity, school board member Jose Huizar.
CA Secured establishment of Architecture, Construction & Engineering (ACE) academy at Locke High School in Watts, benefiting at least 120 students per year.         X     Low-income children and youth Community Coalition, Green Dot Public Schools, Youth & Workforce Development Alliance
CA Increased access to student bus passes by securing streamlined procedures. Conservatively estimated, at least 20,000 students saved $320 to $380 per year on bus fare, totaling $47 million from mid 2005 through 2011. $47,000,000     X X     Low-income children and youth Labor Community Strategy Center/Bus Riders Union
CA Stopped mid-year “renorming” that would have resulted in teacher reductions and larger class sizes, valued at $18 million for each of 5 years. Benefits 100,000 students. $90,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth ACORN, Inner City Struggle, POWER (People Organized for Westside Renewal), One LA, CADRE (Community Asset Development Re-defining Education), United Teachers of L.A.
CA Won the construction of a new high school ($206,707,370) and a new elementary school ($92,358,634) for the East Los Angeles community. Esteban E. Torres High School will be the first high school to open in unincorporated East Los Angeles in more than 80 years. $299,066,004       X     Low-income children and youth InnerCity Struggle, Boyle Heights Learning Collaborative
CA Prevented liquor-licensed building from development near Lincoln High School in Lincoln Heights, benefiting hundreds of students annually.       X X     Low-income children and youth L.A. Voice-PICO (People Improving Communities through Organizing), Sacred Heart Church, Fr. Mario Torres, Lincoln Heights Action Coalition
CA Won passage of Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) cafeteria reform motion that reduces the amount of sugar, salt and trans fat in cafeteria food served at all 700+ LAUSD schools, strengthens food inspection and handling processes and created a parent-lead Cafeteria Reform Committee that oversees implementation of the motion. Benefits 690,000 students.         X X   Low-income children and youth POWER (People Organized for Westside Renewal), ACORN, Marlene Canter, The Healthy Schools Collaborative
CA Secured state Quality Education Investment Act (QEIA) funds for underperforming schools in South and East Lost Angeles, totaling at least $326 million through 2011. Benefits tens of thousands of students. $326,787,737       X     Low-income children and youth Community Coalition, InnerCity Struggle
CA Defeated Proposition 6, which would have increased funding for prisons, imposed stricter penalties for some crimes and tried juveniles as adults in gang related offenses.         X   X Low-income children and youth InnerCity Struggle, Labor Community Strategy Center, CADRE (Community Asset Development Re-defining Education), LAM, FACTS (Families to Amend California's Three Strikes), Youth Justice Coalition, A New Way of Life, CHIRLA (Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles), and Korean Resource Center
CA Prevented elimination of all of L.A. county’s 19 youth probation camps, which are alternatives to being imprisoned with incarcerated adults, and restored proposed state budget cuts. Benefited 4,000 workers and thousands of youth annually. $201,000,000       X   X Low-income children and youth ACORN, AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees) Local 685
CA Worked with city of Santa Monica to establish three-year summer youth job-training internship program, providing $8 per hour for 20 hours per week over eight weeks for 120 youth over three summers. $153,600 X     X     Low-income children and youth L.A. Voice-PICO (People Improving Communities through Organizing), Jewish Vocational Services, Mayor Richard Bloom, city officials of Santa Monica
CA Secured $70.8 million in state budget for kinship care in the foster care system. Benefits tens of thousands of relative caregivers and kinship families. $70,800,000 X     X     Low-income children and youth Community Coalition, California Assembly Speaker Karen Bass, Casey Family Programs, kinship groups across California
CA Won $1 million to clean up a five-acre, five-story-high toxic mountain of concrete rubble and cement debris, known as La Montaña, in Huntington Park. $1,000,000     X   X   Low-income community residents CBE (Communities for a Better Environment)
CA Secured Los Angeles City Council passage of Nuisance Abatement Ordinance to crack down on nuisance businesses that attract crime, benefiting millions of Los Angeles residents.     X X       Low-income community residents Community Coalition, United Coalition East, Los Angeles City Councilwoman Jan Perry
CA Secured neighborhood improvements from L.A. City Council, including two new traffic lights; opening of public swimming pool; traffic safety measures including stop signs, repaving; video surveillance cameras. Dollar value could not be estimated, but likely is hundreds of thousands of dollars, benefiting 250,000 residents.     X         Low-income community residents ACORN, council members Janice Hahn, Jan Perry, Ed Reyes; Mayor Villaraigosa
CA South Coast Air Quality Management District adopted Rule 1118, to reduce emissions from flaring by 75% at nine facilities, resulting in reduction of sulfur-oxide emissions to 0.5 tons per day by 2012 (from two tons per day in 2003). Benefits thousands of area residents.       X   X   Low-income community residents CBE (Communities for a Better Environment)
CA In Vernon, a city in southeast Los Angeles, defeated proposed large 943-megawatt fossil fuel power plant that would have emitted $1.7 million pounds of local and regional pollution and millions of tons of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide each year, thereby prevented aggravated asthma, chronic bronchitis, other respiratory illnesses and premature death of 40,000 area residents and workers.       X   X   Low-income community residents CBE (Communities for a Better Environment)
CA Negotiated a Good Neighbor Agreement with Kinder Morgan Energy Partners on the expansion of their tank farm in the City of Carson, to reduce its emissions of toxic air pollution by 80%; install equipment to prevent groundwater and soil contamination; provide $50,000 to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America for the Breathmobile asthma van to visit public schools; provide funding to the Los Angeles Unified School District to replace two dirty diesel school buses with new CNG-powered buses; and provide funding for job training. Benefits thousands of residents and students.       X X X   Low-income community residents CBE (Communities for a Better Environment)
CA Secured development of one-stop homelessness center that provides services for 14,000 homeless individuals each year and permanent supportive housing for at least 50. The impact is valued at $1.5 million for purchase of land, $4.5 million annually to operate the center for first five years (2007–2011). $24,000,000   X         Low-income community residents L.A. Voice-PICO (People Improving Communities through Organizing), People Assisting the Homeless (PATH), Corporation for Supportive Housing
CA Saved 26 units at Venice Manor as affordable housing, valued at $300,000 each, benefiting 39 low- and moderate-income residents. $7,800,000   X         Low-income community residents POWER (People Organized for Westside Renewal)
CA Saved Holiday Venice, a 250-unit project based Section 8 housing development, from conversion to market rate housing. Benefits 1,100 residents. $73,800,000   X         Low-income community residents POWER (People Organized for Westside Renewal), Locke, Lord Bissel & Liddel; Venice Community Housing Corporation; Public Counsel; LAFLA (Legal Aid Foundation Los Angeles)
CA Enforced state Mello Act in City of Los Angeles and Marina del Rey to protect and create affordable housing; ensured building of 134 units of affordable housing, valued at $400,000 per unit. $53,600,000   X         Low-income community residents POWER (People Organized for Westside Renewal), LAFLA (Legal Aid Foundation Los Angeles), Western Center on Law and Poverty
CA Secured enforcement of central city west inclusionary zoning policy that resulted in 250 new affordable units and in-lieu fees totaling $5 million. $5,000,000   X         Low-income community residents ACORN, SCANPH (Southern California Association of Non-Profit Housing), ACLU, LAFLA (Legal Aid Foundation Los Angeles), Western Center on Law & Poverty
CA Won L.A. City Council passage of the LAX Community Benefits Agreement, which includes settlement agreements with the Lennox and Inglewood School Districts to address air quality issues related to airport expansion. Benefits 100,000 residents. $500,000,000 X   X X X   Low-income community residents LAANE (Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy) and LAX Coalition for Economic, Environmental and Educational Justice: 23 community, faith-based, labor, schools, environmental and environmental justice organizations, including CBE (Communities for a Better Environments), SCOPE (Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education) and Community Coalition.
CA Public officials agreed to formally link city job creation efforts to lower-income job seekers in South L.A. Public workforce development systems were retooled to provide better services to formerly incarcerated job seekers. Benefits 1,000 job seekers.   X           Low-income community residents Los Angeles Metropolitan Churches, local employers, several ex-offender groups such as A New Way of Life, and Congresswoman Maxine Waters, former Mayor James Hahn, Councilwoman Jan Perry
CA Helped defeat Proposition 98, which would have eliminated rent control statewide.     X         Low-income community residents Housing advocates, Coalition for Economic Survival, Coalition LA, KIWA (Koreatown Immigrant Workers Alliance)
CA As part of Clean Trucks Campaign, won replacement of dirty diesel trucks estimated to benefit the health of residents and reduce deaths and need for medical services to treat respiratory ailments. Benefits thousands of port drivers, residents and businesses located near ports and along transport corridors. $2,200,000,000     X   X   Low-income community residents; small businesses LAANE (Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy), Coalition for Safe and Clean Ports, composed of 39 community and labor organizations, including CHIRLA (Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles) and CBE (Communities for a Better Environment).
CA The LAX Enhancement Zone Living Wage Ordinance requires hotels in the region to provide living wages and days off for hotel workers; and it requires the city to invest in street improvements, explore development of a convention center and implement a joint recycling and waste management program. The coalition helped negotiate collective bargaining agreements for workers at four hotels. The living wage ordinance and new union contracts have generated at least $18.5 million in direct wages and benefits for 3,000 hotel workers. $18,500,000 X           Low-wage workers Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE) and the Coalition for a New Century, which includes clergy, labor, community groups and immigrant rights activists.
CA 3,500 security guards in L.A. area office buildings won significant improvements in wages, benefits and training totaling $96,600,000 in their first three year contract (2008–2011). $96,600,000 X           Low-wage workers Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE), Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Los Angeles; L.A. NAACP; SEIU Local 1877; CLUE (Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice) Los Angeles.
CA Won Construction Careers Policy through the Community Redevelopment Agency, which will target 15,000 construction jobs for disadvantaged workers. $49,652,417 X           Low-wage workers Los Angeles Alliance for a New Economy (LAANE), faith-based leaders and ex-offender groups
CA State increased the California minimum wage by $1.25 to $8 per hour, effective January 2008. The portion benefiting LA County through 2011 is $2.646 billion. Benefits 445,500 L.A. workers directly and 189,000 indirectly. $2,646,000,000 X           Low-wage workers ACORN, California Labor Federation, SEIU
CA L.A. City Council passed the Municipal Green Building Retrofit and Workforce Development Ordinance, which will train and give jobs to 2,000 disadvantaged workers to make public facilities more energy efficient. Dollar value includes $22 million secured to date for job training and construction. Likely savings to taxpayers from reduced energy costs down the road will be substantial. $22,000,000 X   X       Low-wage workers SCOPE (Strategic Concepts in Organizing and Policy Education) and Los Angeles Apollo Alliance, a coalition of environmental, economic justice, labor and business organizations, including Community Coalition and CBE (Communities for a Better Environment).
CA Won lawsuit settlement for 50 current Assi Market workers that will also benefit future workers. $1,475,000 X           Low-wage workers Koreatown Immigrant Workers Alliance (KIWA)
CA For 3,700 taxi drivers, won $15 airport minimum fare, increase in meter per flag drop from $2 to $2.20 to $2.45, loosened uniform requirement. Also won from LAX airport contractor: stronger due process rights, clean bathrooms, benches in shaded areas, and water fountain away from restroom, and stopped police harassment. Based on survey of workers, fare changes estimated to increase fare revenues by $19 million per year, projected for five years (2007–2011). $95,000,000 X           Low-wage workers Los Angeles Taxi Workers Alliance, SAN, APALC (Asian Pacific American Legal Center), Inner City Law Center and private attorneys
CA Won living wage agreements at numerous Korean markets, benefiting 5,000 workers.   X           Low-wage workers KIWA (Koreatown Immigrant Workers Alliance)
CA Secured MTA commitment to build and federal funding for bus-only lanes for Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles, benefiting thousands of commuters. $24,400,000     X       Public transit riders Labor Community Strategy Center/Bus Riders Union
CA Achieved Congressional reauthorization of federal Voting Rights Act sections affecting race, language and minority voting rights.             X People of color APALC (Asian Pacific American Legal Center), Voting Rights Act Collaborative, including 20 state and national legal advocacy organizations.
ID Stopped state of Idaho from implementing the federal Real ID Act, which would have cost the state millions of dollars to implement and would have required 1,126,889 residents over the age of 18 to pay as much as $100 to secure a new photo identity card. Cost savings were conservatively estimated at $50 per person over 18 in Idaho. $56,344,450           X Immigrants Idaho Community Action Network, Idaho ACLU
ID Stopped Idaho legislature from enacting a bill that would allow the insurance industry to mislead consumers whose primary language was other than English.             X Immigrants Idaho Community Action Network
ID As part of national campaign, secured congressional reauthorization of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), benefiting 30,000 Idaho enrollees. Succeeded in adding provisions to the program that allowed states to extend coverage to legal immigrants in the country for less than five years.           X   Low-income children and youth Idaho Community Action Network, Northwest Federation of Community Organizations, Mountain States Group, Health Rights Organizing Project
ID Secured increase in Idaho state minimum wage that paralleled the federal increases. This ensured that workers covered only by the state wage law, including farmworkers and restaurant workers, would have parity with all other minimum wage workers. Wage increase projected through 2012 for 15,510 minimum wage workers in Idaho. $48,856,500 X           Low-wage workers Idaho Community Action Network
ID Successfully pressured Lewiston Burger King management to end discriminatory employment practices against workers of color, pay employees for lost wages, terminate a manager at fault, provide cultural sensitivity training, end favoritism and establish a fair promotions process.   X         X People of color Idaho Community Action Network, Northwest Federation of Community Organizations, Burger King employees, Nez Perce tribal elder, community members
ID Successfully organized opposition to a proposed coal fired power plant in the rural Magic valley region surrounding Twin Falls. Spurred state to initiate energy planning process.       X       Rural residents Idaho Rural Council, Idaho Conservation League
ID Convinced state to enter into negotiated rulemaking to regulate application of toxic dairy waste onto rural agricultural lands. Resulted in increased fines for misapplication of sprayed waste.       X       Rural residents Idaho Rural Council
ID Helped rural neighborhood groups successfully oppose land use permits for large-scale animal factories in rural parts of the state.       X       Rural residents Idaho Rural Council
ID Helped 29,000 Elmore County residents and other communities fend off a nuclear power plant proposed by Alternative Energy Holdings, Inc. (AEHI).       X       Rural residents Snake River Alliance, Sierra Club, Idaho Conservation League, Idaho River United and other groups
ID Prevented the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) from being implemented in Idaho. GNEP was a federal proposal that would have identified U.S. nuclear facilities such as Idaho National Laboratory to engage in commercial reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel, posing a security and environmental threat to the state.       X       Rural residents Snake River Alliance, Alliance for Nuclear Accountability
ID Organized to stop a federal Department of Energy proposal to consolidate all its highly radioactive plutonium 238 activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Benefits 250,000 residents who drink from the aquifer and INL workers.       X       Rural residents and workers Snake River Alliance, Alliance for Nuclear Accountability
ID Ensured ongoing remediation and cleanup at INL, where 750,000 barrels of waste from the cold war era were dumped in unlined pits and trenches. The wastes contained radionuclides, heavy metals and toxic chemicals that have contaminated the Snake River Aquifer, used by more than 250,000 people for drinking water and also as a water source for agriculture. Reached agreement with INL on the degree of further cleanup needed as well as the best practices that would be used to do so.       X       Rural residents and workers Snake River Alliance, Alliance for Nuclear Accountability
ID Created Idaho Energy Collaborative, which brought together conservation groups, state agencies, businesses and others to build a common base of knowledge and advocate for innovative clean energy policies in areas such as energy efficiency, clean energy and fostering green businesses and jobs.   X   X       Small businesses Snake River Alliance and 40 green businesses, organizations and government agencies
LA Informed White House’s BP Oil Spill Initiative, serving the Asian-Pacific Islander community nationally. Connected API community to funders and federal agencies, including Homeland Security, Labor, Commerce and Energy. Educated federal policy makers on how residents and fishers were affected by the oil spill and ways to address linguistic and cultural competency issues for Vietnamese and other ethnic families affected by the oil spill, who faced barriers to accessing services and compensation.   X   X       Immigrants; victims of environmental disasters Vietnamese American Young Leaders Association-New Orleans, Southeast Asian Resource Action Center, Power of a Million Minds youth collaborative
LA Promoted housing opportunities for people with disabilities, including winning 3,000 permanent supportive housing vouchers and enabling group homes to open in Denham Springs and New Orleans. Value of 3,000 vouchers averaged just under $10,000 per year for five years. $145,700,000   X         Individuals with disabilities Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center, Louisiana Housing Finance Agency, Louisiana Housing Alliance, Senator Landrieu, Unity for the Homeless
LA Established Refinery Efficiency Initiative (REI), a program to reduce pollution and improve health and quality of life by preventing accidents at Louisiana oil refineries. REI engages fenceline communities, regulatory agencies, workers and refineries to find solutions collectively that bring down accident rates.       X   X   Low-income community residents Louisiana Bucket Brigade
LA Secured $25 million in state funding for the Housing Trust Fund, which had been created but never given resources. It will provide affordable housing for residents across the state. $25,000,000   X         Low-income community residents Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center, Louisiana Housing Alliance, Louisiana Association of Nonprofit Organizations, Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation, Senator Lydia Jackson, Senator Cheryl Gray Evans
LA Several hundred former residents of St. Thomas public housing development received housing vouchers to live there. The value is estimated at $1,250 per month for 250 units over five years. $18,750,000   X         Low-income community residents Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center, Tulane Law Clinic, attorneys, St. Thomas Residents
LA Establishment of the Children and Families Action Network (CFAN) and the Human Services Response Initiative (HSRI) immediately after the devastation caused by Hurricane Rita ensured that $1.8 million in public, private and philanthropic resources were used most effectively to provide equitable recovery for hundreds of residents.   X           Low-income community residents; victims of natural disasters Family and Youth Counseling Agency, Mayor of Lake Charles, CFAN (Children and Families Action Network) members, philanthropy
LA After Hurricane Katrina, defeated attempt by the New Orleans mayor to locate an enhanced construction and debris dumpsite in the Vietnamese community of New Orleans East, where residents already were rebuilding.       X       Low-income community residents; victims of natural disasters Vietnamese American Young Leaders Association-New Orleans, Southeast Asian Resource Action Center, Mary Queen of Vietnam (MQVN) Community Development Corporation, Louisiana Environmental Action Network
LA Fought and litigated for fair treatment of all homeowners under federal/state Road Home program and won more than $2 billion in additional compensation grants for low-income homeowners to rebuild their properties after hurricanes. $2,079,041,258   X         Low-income homeowners; victims of natural disasters Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center, National Fair Housing Alliance, PolicyLink
LA Successfully litigated with St. Bernard Parish to end discriminatory housing ordinances, opening up housing opportunities. Received $50,000 in damages and $1.3 million in legal fees. $1,350,000   X         People of color Greater New Orleans Fair Housing Action Center
LA Organized partners and resources to spur West End redevelopment in New Iberia, which may bring up to $50 million investment over 10 years; $1.7 million already is committed through public and private sources. $1,700,000   X         Rural residents Southern Mutual Help Association, Mayor of New Iberia Parish, Mennonite Disaster Service, other community institutions
LA Rural Recovery Response initiative ensured that after hurricanes, $13.3 million in investment went to rural 1,064 homeowners, fishers, farmers, businesses and churches, which may generate as much as $108 million in broader economic impact in rural Louisiana. $13,300,000 X X         Rural residents Southern Mutual Help Association, Iberia Bank, Mennonite Disaster Service, volunteers from 48 states, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, Louisiana Disaster Recovery Foundation and many more
LA Organized state agencies, service providers and philanthropy to improve access to mental health services for 250 women annually, including those suffering postpartum depression.           X   Users of mental health services; women Family and Youth Counseling Agency, Louisiana Office of Public Health, Louisiana Office of Behavioral Health, National Alliance on Mental Illness for Southwestern Louisiana (NAMI - SWLA), The Counseling Center, many other mental health practitioners and medical personnel
LA Created Oil Spill Crisis Map as a visual representation of citizen reports of where they have seen, smelled or otherwise been affected by the BP oil spill. These data have informed federal health studies of the spill’s affects and may inform future public policy.       X       Victims of environmental disasters Louisiana Bucket Brigade, Tulane University
MN Prevented state from enacting proposals that would have negatively affected immigrants and refugees, including prohibiting compliance with the REAL ID act of 2005, which would force every Minnesotan to obtain a national ID card and disparately impact the immigrant community, as well as costing the state $64.5 million to implement. $64,500,000           X Immigrants Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota (ILCM), AFFIRM (Alliance for Fair Federal Immigration Reform of Minnesota) Coalition, legislative leaders
MN Passage of Flat Rate Tuition bill that allows undocumented immigrants to attend two-year and technical colleges and have access to in-state tuition. Benefits 3,540 college students. $4,800,000       X   X Immigrants Centro Campesino, Minnesota Immigrant Freedom Network, ISAIAH, Jewish Community Action, AFFIRM (Alliance for Fair Federal Immigration Reform of Minnesota), and others
MN Extension of legal status to 3,600 Liberians in 2007 and 2009, ensuring their ability to stay in the U.S.             X Immigrants ILCM (Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota), Jewish Community Action, Office of Liberians in Minnesota, Fairview Hospital, Advocates for Human Rights
MN Creation of Minnesota's "Working Group on Ethnic Heritage and New Americans" to help foster a more understanding environment for the state's immigrant and refugee population of 300,000. The Working Group has been a forum for bipartisan discussion and analysis of complex immigration issues.             X Immigrants ILCM (Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota), AFFIRM (Alliance for Fair Federal Immigration Reform of Minnesota), Minnesota Chamber of Commerce
MN Combined legal assistance and grassroots coordination to respond to workplace raids in which federal agents rounded up hundreds of immigrant workers at the Swift plant in Worthington. Joined with others nationally to support more humane treatment of immigrant detainees, including successful humanitarian policy to minimize keeping breast-feeding mothers in detention, separated from their nursing children.             X Immigrants ILCM (Immigrant Law Center of Minnesota), UFCW (United Food and Commercial Workers) 789, St. Mary's Catholic Church, Worthington Adult Basic Education and Community Education, MIFN (Minnesota Immigrant Freedom Network), American Immigration Lawyers Association
MN Organized Latino families in Montgomery after city purchased apartment buildings for demolition and redevelopment, forcing eviction of tenants; won reparations of $17,000 for each of 13 families and a commitment by the city to work with private developers to promote affordable housing in the future. The city agreed to also take several steps to combat race discrimination and foster better relations and communication with the Latino community. $221,000   X       X Immigrants Centro Campesino
MN Minneapolis school district adopted a bilingual education policy. Policy affects 8,000 English-language learners in the district.         X   X Immigrants; low-income children and youth Somali Action Alliance
MN Saved the English Language Learners (ELL) department in the Minneapolis public school system, preventing a merger with the special education department, keeping English-language learners distinct from special education students. Impact benefits the 8,000 English-language learners in the district.         X   X Immigrants; low-income children and youth Somali Action Alliance
MN Cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul and Hennepin County adopted "ban the box" policies, which removed the question requiring disclosure of past criminal records on applications for employment with the Cities and County. Could benefit tens of thousands of people with criminal records in the Twin Cities.   X         X Incarcerated-formerly individuals Council on Crime and Justice
MN State of Minnesota adopted "ban the box" policy, which required all Minnesota public employers to wait until a job applicant has been selected for an interview before asking about criminal records, except for positions that already require a background check. Benefits 65,000 people with criminal records statewide.   X         X Incarcerated-formerly individuals Council on Crime and Justice, Second Chance Coalition: 180 Degrees, Inc., Amicus, Goodwill/Easter Seals Minnesota, Rebuild Resources, Jacob Wetterling Foundation, RS Eden, Minnesota Council of Churches, Minnesota Catholic Conference, Minnesota Fathers & Families Network, Northside Policy Action Coalition, People Escaping Poverty Project, Project for Pride in Living, Children's Defense Fund, Peace Foundation, Minneapolis Urban League, HIRED, LIFE in Recovery, National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota, the Barbara Schneider Foundation, Elim Transitional Housing, Emerge Community Development, Greater Minneapolis Council on Churches, Juel Fairbanks Chemical Dependency Services
MN State of Minnesota adopted "Safe Hiring" civil liability law, which limits the admission of evidence of an employee's criminal record in certain cases. Benefits 65,000 people with criminal records statewide.   X         X Incarcerated-formerly individuals Council on Crime and Justice, Second Chance Coalition, Minnesota Chamber of Commerce
MN Increased state funding for discharge planners to help transition formerly incarcerated individuals using mental illness services; $200,000 per year projected through 2011. Benefits 280 inmates annually. $800,000         X   Incarcerated-formerly; users of mental health services National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota, Minnesota Mental Health Action Group, Mental Health Legislative Network
MN Development of 1,200-person statewide network, Self-Advocacy Minnesota, which works with groups to promote personal empowerment, disability awareness and systems change. State appropriation of $134,0000 per year beginning in 2009 and multiyear grant from the MN Council on Developmental Disabilities beginning in 2008 both projected through 2011. $802,000         X X Individuals with disabilities Advocating Change Together (ACT)
MN 1,480 people with disabilities served as leaders in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities and piloted human rights trainings internationally. The United States has yet to sign-on to this convention.             X Individuals with disabilities Advocating Change Together (ACT), Minnesota Center on Human Rights, Harvard Project on Disability, Shafalla Center on Disability (Qatar), United Nations Human Rights Workers
MN Campaign to encourage respectful language for people with disabilities led to the creation of an educational DVD, which served to facilitate dialogue on language at community forums attended by 1,600 community members.             X Individuals with disabilities ACT, Self-Advocates Minnesota (SAM), Arc Greater Twin Cities, Research and Training Center on Community Living – University of Minnesota, Metro Center for Independent Living, Governor's Council on Developmental Disabilities, Minnesota State Council on Disability, Courage Center
MN Secured state funding for MAP (Minnesota AIDS Project) AIDS line and HIV prevention program in foreign-born communities. $250,000         X   Individuals with HIV/AIDS Minnesota AIDS Project (MAP)
MN Prevented targeted funding cuts that would have significantly reduced the ability of MAP (Minnesota AIDS Project) to conduct its prevention outreach. Benefits at least 6,220 people living with HIV/AIDS statewide. $800,000         X   Individuals with HIV/AIDS Minnesota AIDS Project (MAP)
MN Secured one-time funding for "systems advocacy" to provide coordinated HIV/AIDS care among the silos of corrections, social services, housing, etc. Benefits at least 6,220 people living with HIV/AIDS statewide. $127,300         X   Individuals with HIV/AIDS Minnesota AIDS Project (MAP)
MN Minnesota became the first state to pass legislation allowing a “mid-level” oral health provider into state statute. The new providers will focus their practice on care for underserved and rural populations in the state and will administer educational, preventive, palliative, therapeutic and restorative services.           X   Rural residents; low-income community residents Three Rivers Community Action, Minnesota Safety Net Coalition, Minnesota Dental Hygienists’ Association
MN Created a task force on mental health services in public schools, which produced a report on K-12 mental health issues. May benefit 100,000 young people. $7,500       X X   Low-income children and youth National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota, MMHAG (The Minnesota Mental Health Action Group)
MN Provided state funding for opt-in suicide prevention programs, such as TeenScreen, in schools. Benefits up to 100,000 students. $1,300,000       X X   Low-income children and youth National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota
MN Worked on passage of Minneapolis School District referendum, which raised significant resources to support public schools, and injected racial equity concerns into discussions of how the funds should be spent. Benefits 34,570 public school students. $61,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth Education Equity Organizing Collaborative, including MIGIZI Communications, Somali Action Alliance, Coalition of Black Churches/ African American Leadership Summit, and ISAIAH; Organizing Apprenticeship Project
MN Secured increase in state funding for public education at a time when funds were slated to be cut. Benefits 822,412 public school students. $480,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth ISAIAH
MN Creation of Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative of Hennepin County, providing comprehensive sex education and better coordination of service delivery. Secured $400,000 per year for the initiative, and funding was projected through 2011. Benefits 268,000 young people in Hennepin County. $2,000,000       X X   Low-income children and youth Minnesota Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy, Prevention & Planning (MOAPPP)
MN Secured state support for proven service-learning curriculum to prevent teen pregnancy and successfully advocated for the state to end support for abstinence-only sex education. Benefits 600,000 youth statewide. $208,000       X X   Low-income children and youth Minnesota Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy, Prevention & Planning (MOAPPP)
MN Defended the Minor Consent Statute, which gives $1.2 million young people the right to make decisions regarding their own sexuality, mental and chemical dependence services.         X X X Low-income children and youth The Minnesota Organization on Adolescent Pregnancy, Prevention and Parenting (MOAPPP), Coalition for Responsible Sex Education
MN The State of Minnesota enacted "Higher Education" notice, which requires all post-secondary education institutions in the state to notify students as to the types of criminal records that could affect their future employment opportunities. New notice policy affects the estimated 30,000 new students entering college each year.         X     Low-income children and youth Council on Crime and Justice
MN Creation of the Minnesota College Access Network (MCAN) to influence the focus of the MN P16 Council in developing frameworks for students of color equity and for college and workforce readiness. MCAN reaches 200,000 students of color, K-12 in public schools.         X     Low-income children and youth of color Minnesota Minority Education Partnership (MMEP)
MN Assisted St. Paul After-School Intervention Collaborative to improve coordination with the school system, enhance service delivery, and address gaps in services, especially for middle school students of color. Also helped the state's academic enrichment programs to better serve students of color. Impacts will affect thousands of students of color in St. Paul.         X     Low-income children and youth of color Minnesota Minority Education Partnership (MMEP)
MN Influenced the Minnesota State Colleges and Universities’ (MNSCU) System-wide Strategic Diversity Plan to reflect urgency for providing opportunities for students of color. Impact affects 27,500 students of color within the MNSCU system.         X     Low-income children and youth of color Minnesota Minority Education Partnership (MMEP)
MN Encouraged St. Cloud to establish a community college access center for students of color. Impact affects 2,700 students of color in St. Cloud.         X     Low-income children and youth of color Minnesota Minority Education Partnership (MMEP)
MN State law restricting the use of restraints and seclusion in community mental health programs for children and allowing parents to remain in custody of their children even in treatment. Benefits 42,000 children receiving state mental health services.           X X Low-income children and youth; users of mental health services National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota, Mental Health Legislative Network
MN Leveraged $2 million in federal stimulus funds to train up to 2,000 lower-income people for green jobs and $500,000 for community education and outreach about energy efficiency. $2,500,000 X   X       Low-income community residents Alliance for Metropolitan Stability, HIRE (Healthcare, Infrastructure, Renewable Energy) Minnesota
MN Prevented affordable housing funding cuts at the state level to benefit lower-income residents of Greater Minnesota. $13,000,000   X         Low-income community residents Three Rivers Community Action, Minnesota Housing Partnership, Greater Minnesota Housing Fund
MN YIMBY (Yes in My Back Yard) initiative countered a campaign against an existing affordable housing development and leveraged additional funds for new affordable housing in Duluth, including 112 units valued at $300,000 per unit and $7 million in additional investments. $40,600,000   X         Low-income community residents Churches United in Ministry (CHUM)
MN Won creation of City of Duluth Housing Investment Fund of $1.4 million that leveraged an additional $38.8 million in affordable housing investments for 333 households. $40,262,493   X         Low-income community residents Churches United in Ministry (CHUM), Affordable Housing Coalition
MN Prevented demolition of 600 Brooklyn Park affordable homes, which would have cost at least $140,000 each to replace. $84,000,000   X         Low-income community residents Alliance for Metropolitan Stability, Community Stabilization Project, Housing Preservation Project, MICAH (Metropolitan Interfaith Council on Affordable Housing), HOME Line
MN Creation of Legislative Commission to End Poverty in Minnesota by 2020. May benefit up to 480,000 residents living in poverty.   X           Low-income community residents Three Rivers Community Action, Minnesota Community Action Partnership
MN Campaign for tenants' rights led to Tenants' Remedies Act in Duluth as recourse for tenants seeking to take control of troubled buildings. "Mayor's Bad Landlord Tours" drew media and public attention to landlord issues, leading to increased enforcement of housing codes. Benefits 30,000 Duluth residents.     X         Low-income community residents CHUM (Churches United in Ministry), Affordable Housing Coalition, Duluth Mayor's Office
MN Community Safety Initiative led to a Duluth city ordinance to address private rental property management issues. Benefits 30,000 Duluth residents.     X         Low-income community residents CHUM (Churches United in Ministry), At Home Coalition, Neighborhood Housing Services, Duluth Police Department
MN Secured funds to improve Wi-Fi access for lower-income people, nonprofit organizations and Greater Minnesota, including $500,000 in a Digital Inclusion Fund. The future aggregate savings in Wi-Fi costs for 8,000 household subscribers will likely exceed a million dollars a year. $500,000 X           Low-income community residents Alliance for Metropolitan Stability, Centro Campesino, ISAIAH, Somali Action Alliance, Asian Media Access, Brian Coyle Community Technology Center (CTC), C-CAN/CTEP (Community Computer Access Network/Community Technology Empowerment Project), Cedar Riverside Neighborhood Association, CommonBond Communities, Eastside Neighborhood Services, Franklin Library, Greater Twin Cities United Way, Headwaters Foundation, Hope Community, Inc., Hosmer Library, Immigrant Freedom Network, MICAH, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board, Northway Community Trust NRP - Cedar Riverside, Phyllis Wheatley/Minneapolis Public Schools, Pillsbury United Communities, Project for Pride in Living, Resource Center of Americas, SeniorNet, St. Paul E-Democracy, TC Daily Planet, Teaming 4 Technology, Triangle Park Creative, Twin Cities Media Alliance, Urban Hope Ministries
MN Secured Central Corridor Community Benefits Agreement to ensure development along the corridor, which included three accessible light rail transit stations valued at $12 million total and a senior affordable housing development valued at $8 million. Benefits 40,000 lower-income people of color living along the Central Corridor. $20,000,000   X X       Low-income community residents; people of color; senior citizens Alliance for Metropolitan Stability, Jewish Community Action, Aurora St. Anthony Neighborhood Development Corporation, Transit for Livable Communities, Community Stabilization Project, District Councils Collaborative, Hmong Business Association, Just Equity, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy, University United, United Food & Commercial Workers
MN Won state statute improving protections for 30,000 migrant workers. The new law doubles the fines for employers who violate written recruitment agreements with migrant workers and also provides that employers who do not pay wages on time can be made to pay twice the amount a worker would have earned.   X         X Low-wage farmworkers Centro Campesino
MN Organized 750 migrant workers in two camps in Owatonna and Montgomery into their own independent union, UTN or United Workers of the North. Although UTN was not recognized by the employers, the workers secured a community kitchen in Montgomery and coverage of child care costs in Owatonna   X           Low-wage farmworkers Centro Campesino
MN Increased state minimum wage from $5.15 to $6.15 per hour, benefiting 117,000 workers. Added wages of $130 million per year were estimated for 2.5 years until federal minimum wage superseded state level. $325,000,000 X           Low-wage workers Jobs Now Coalition, including Three Rivers Community Action, Minnesota Council of Nonprofits, Advocating Change Together, and dozens of nonprofit and labor organizations
MN Organized to create holistic, culturally appropriate successful tobacco reduction programs that incorporate leadership development, benefiting hundreds of Native Americans.           X   Native Americans Indigenous People's Task Force
MN Secured Community Policing Agreement with St. Cloud Police Department to promote greater cultural and ethnic awareness within the department and reduce instances of racial profiling. Benefits at least 5,000 people of color in Duluth.             X People of color ISAIAH
MN Won constitutional amendment that increased proportion of Motor Vehicle Sales Tax allocated to transportation. Based on the phase-in schedule, this revenue source is estimated to provide $560.7 million for transit through 2011. Will benefit millions of public transit riders. $560,700,000     X       Public transit riders ISAIAH, Transit Partners Coalition
MN Won long-term commitment of state funding for road and transit infrastructure improvements, with a substantial portion dedicated to improving public transportation. The total ten-year investment in transportation is estimated to be as much as $6.6. billion; conservative estimates of transit revenue from new quarter-cent sales tax are $85 million per year, projected through 2011. Will benefit millions of public transit riders. $340,000,000     X       Public transit riders Transit Partners Coalition, including: Alliance for Metropolitan Stability, ISAIAH, Transit for Livable Communities, Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1005, Fresh Energy, League of Women Voters Minnesota, Minnesota Center for Environmental Advocacy, Minnesota Environmental Partnership, Minnesota Senior Federation, Sierra Club North Star Chapter
MN Brokered community benefits agreement establishing high workforce goals through Small, Women, Minority Business Enterprise (SWMBE) Program to ensure inclusion of 300 women and minority workers and contractors in the building of Target Field, the new stadium for the Minnesota Twins. $103,000,000 X           Small businesses; women; people of color ISAIAH, County Commissioner, Summit Academy OIC (Opportunities Industrialization Centers)
MN Secured $300,000 per year increased state funds for specialized employment program serving 1,230 users of mental health services annually, projected through 2011. $2,100,000 X       X   Users of mental health services National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota, Minnesota Mental Health Action Group (MMHAG)
MN Restored state mental hospital cemeteries previously only marked with a number, giving 2,000 of those buried there proper markers with name, and dates of birth and death. Also secured an apology from the legislature for the state's treatment of mental health consumers $135,000           X Users of mental health services Advocating Change Together (ACT), Ladies Auxiliary, Power Up Club, Alliance for the Mentally Ill, Arc Chapters, Disability Law Center
MN Increased state mental health funding benefiting thousands of victims of trauma and refugees. $375,000         X   Users of mental health services National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota
MN Increased state mental health reimbursement rates for services. Benefits 166,000 beneficiaries of state mental health services. $7,486,000         X   Users of mental health services National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota, MMHAG (The Minnesota Mental Health Action Group), Mental Health Legislative Network
MN Passage of State Mental Health Initiative, committing increased resources of $34 million per year to improve the state's mental health system. Benefits 166,000 beneficiaries of state mental health services. $120,600,000         X   Users of mental health services National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota, MMHAG (The Minnesota Mental Health Action Group), Mental Health Legislative Network
MN Secured state provision of "Bridges program" housing for thousands of people with severe and persistent mental illness (SPMI) awaiting federal Section 8 housing subsidies. $2,000,000   X     X   Users of mental health services National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota
MN Several state provisions enacted, including: requiring foster care training, assisting people from cultural communities to become mental health professionals, requiring a mental health screening in the jails and developing a protocol on solitary confinement. Benefits 166,000 recipients of state mental health services.           X   Users of mental health services National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota, Mental Health Legislative Network, MMHAG (Minnesota Mental Health Action Group)
MN Provide for continuation of care for up to 100,000 youth receiving state mental health services after age 18. Also provision of voluntary mental health screening for suspended students.           X   Users of mental health services; low-income children and youth National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota
MN State law providing for voluntary mental health screening if a student is suspended for more than 10 days in a school year and requiring that schools develop a response plan if the dropout rate for students with emotional behavioral disability is high.         X X   Users of mental health services; low-income children and youth National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota
MN State law requiring health care providers to give information on potential harmful effects of post-partum depression to pregnant women, benefiting up to 73,000 new mothers each year.           X   Users of mental health services; women National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Minnesota
MN Secured increased funding for victims' services for two years. Prevented 7 percent cut in subsequent two years. Benefits 106,000 recipients of crime victim services. $3,315,000           X Victims of domestic violence Range Women's Advocates, Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women, Battered Women's Legal Advocacy Project, Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault (MNCASA), Minnesota Network on Abuse in Later Life (MNALL), Minnesota Indian Women's Sexual Assault Coalition
MN Use of state funding to develop a blueprint for handling of domestic violence cases as a result of an audit of the St. Paul system. Benefits at least 5,000 adult and children victims of domestic violence annually. $500,000           X Victims of domestic violence ISAIAH, St. Paul Intervention Project, St. Paul Police Department
MN Won statute categorizing strangulation as a felony in domestic violence cases, benefiting 250 victims of domestic violence annually.             X Victims of domestic violence RWA (Range Women's Advocates), MCBW (Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women), Battered Women's Legal Advocacy Project
MN Won extension of standard Order for Protection from one year to two; secured provision making communication between abuse victims and advocates privileged; and won a study to examine the proposed presumption of joint physical custody of children in high-conflict or domestic violence cases. For six years, advocates have fended off proposed legislation granting joint physical custody. Benefits at least 35,000 adult and children victims of domestic violence annually.             X Victims of domestic violence RWA (Range Women's Advocates), MCBW (Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women), Battered Women's Legal Advocacy Project
MN Improved victim safety by ensuring that Orders for Protection are enforceable across state, tribe and territory lines. Benefits at least 35,000 adult and children victims of domestic violence annually.             X Victims of domestic violence RWA (Range Women's Advocates), MCBW (Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women), Battered Women's Legal Advocacy Project
MN Secured state law allowing a residential tenant who is a victim of domestic abuse and fears imminent abuse if the tenant or the tenant's minor children remain in the leased premises to terminate a lease agreement without penalty or liability. Benefits all victims of domestic violence in leased housing.     X       X Victims of domestic violence RWA (Range Women's Advocates), MCBW (Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women), Battered Women's Legal Advocacy Project
MS Through organizing and legal advocacy, compelled City of Jackson to improve transit services and access for people with disabilities, including allocating $139,000 over three years for an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) compliance officer. $139,000     X     X individuals with disabilities Mississippi Coalition for Citizens with Disabilities
MS Prevented a major state funding cut of $110 million to Medicaid that would have eliminated important health services for 48,000 senior participants and those with disabilities. $110,000,000         X   Individuals with disabilities; senior citizens Mississippi Coalition for Citizens with Disabilities, Mississippi Center for Justice, AARP, National Senior Citizen Law Center
MS Contributed to successful efforts at the state and national levels to reauthorize State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) and enact national health care reform.           X   Low-income children and youth Children’s Defense Fund, many coalition partners, including Equal Voice for America’s Families, Mississippi Center for Justice, health care practitioners, Head Start networks, state legislators, religious communities, schools
MS The Mississippi Adequate Education Program (MAEP), a formula to ensure an adequate education for every Mississippi child, was fully funded in 2008 by the state legislature for the first time since its inception – an increase of $222 million over 2007 funding level. Approximately 10,000 students dropout of Mississippi’s schools annually, costing the state a staggering $458 million a year in lost revenue and public assistance and incarceration costs. MAEP will affect more than 490,000 public school students. $222,271,597       X     Low-income children and youth Children’s Defense Fund, Southern Echo, Parents Campaign, NAACP Education Network
MS Defeated charter school bills in state legislature that would have caused a disinvestment in already underfunded public schools. Impact reaches more than 490,000 public school students.         X     Low-income children and youth Children’s Defense Fund, 6 legislators from Mississippi Delta
MS Worked with county officials to develop and adopt five-year plan to reform education system in Tunica County. Reform impacts 2,600 public school students         X     Low-income children and youth Concerned Citizens for a Better Tunica County, Tunica County School Board
MS Successful campaign at the local level (Tunica County) and state level to reform school discipline policies that violated student rights. Secured passage of Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2009. Reform Act impacts more than 490,000 public school students.         X   X Low-income children and youth Concerned Citizens for a Better Tunica County, Prevention of Schoolhouse to Jailhouse Coalition, ACLU, Mississippi NAACP, Southern Echo
MS Convinced state Department of Human Services to make a recourse policy for a fair hearings process in the child care subsidy program.   X           Low-income children and youth; childcare providers Mississippi Low-Income Child Care Initiative, Mississippi Center for Justice
MS Issued report entitled, “MS Child Care Development Fund: Program Implementation, Evaluation and Analysis” that was released by the State Auditor’s Office with 14 recommendations. Report was basis for reform legislation requiring an external audit of DHS’s use of federal child care money.   X           Low-income children and youth; childcare providers Mississippi Low-Income Child Care Initiative, Mississippi State University Stennis Institute of Government
MS After Hurricane Katrina, secured a portion of federal community development block grant funds for affordable housing through the Neighborhood Home Program that the governor had attempted to use to expand a port. Achievement impacted 4,400 low-income households. $132,800,000   X         Low-income community residents Mississippi Coalition for Citizens with Disabilities, NAACP, Mississippi Center for Justice, Steps Coalition, Gulf Coast Fair Housing Center
MS Organized residents to participate in 2010 Census, which exceeded the census response rate from 2000. Also organized resident participation in the Mississippi State Legislative Reapportionment Committee’s series of public hearings concerning adoption of guidelines to redistrict the congressional, legislative and judicial offices in 2011.             X Low-income community residents Southern Echo, Mississippi 2010 Census Stakeholder Alliance and other state, regional and national census and redistricting networks
MT Defeated more than twenty anti-immigrant bills introduced in two consecutive biennial state legislative sessions. These included bills that would deny public assistance to undocumented immigrants, require English proficiency to obtain a driver’s license and allow police to stop anyone for questioning if the officer suspected the person of violating federal immigration law. Impact affects 30,000 immigrant residents.             X Immigrants Montana Human Rights Network, ACLU of Montana, and a coalition including immigration attorneys, labor organizations, faith groups, civil rights groups and domestic violence prevention groups
MT Through ballot measure, won expansion of State Children’s Health Insurance Program and Medicaid eligibility from 175 to 250 percent of federal poverty level. Then ensured legislature fully funded the state portion of expansion against threats to cut or eliminate the plan's funding. When all 30,000 eligible children are enrolled, $22 million in state funds and $70 million in federal funds will be accessed. $92,000,000         X   Low-income children and youth Montana Human Rights Network, Montana Women Vote, Montana Children's Defense Fund, Forward Montana, SEIU medical and hospital associations and other members of the Healthy Montana Kids Coalition
MT Secured $15 million in federal stimulus funds to make energy efficiency improvements in Montana public schools. This resulted in the leveraging of additional funds and will save school districts energy costs in the long term. $15,000,000     X X     Low-income children and youth Northern Plains Resource Council
MT In 2005, won passage of state bill to allow residents to register to vote up to and including election day. Defended attempts to roll back this law in 2007 and 2009. Almost 7,500 Montana voters utilized late registration in 2006 and more than 10,000 did so in 2008.             X Low-income community residents Montana Women Vote, Montana Conservation Voters, Disability Rights Montana, League of Women Voters, AARP
MT Won passage of state bill to allow voters to apply to vote by mail, allowing no-fault absentee ballots, which has led to increase in voter participation. In the 2006 general election, 29 percent of Montana voters cast ballots by mail and this number was up to 43 percent in 2008.             X Low-income community residents Montana Women Vote, Montana Conservation Voters, Disability Rights Montana, League of Women Voters, AARP
MT Through ballot measure, raised the minimum wage in Montana by $1.00 per hour and secured an annual cost of living adjustment based on the Consumer Price Index. Wage increase projected through 2012. These impacts will affect 24,508 workers. $237,114,900 X           Low-wage workers Montana Human Rights Network, Montana Women Vote, Forward Montana, AFL-CIO, Progressive Labor Caucus, Working for Equality and Economic Liberation, MEA-MFT (Montana Education Association and the Montana Federation of Teachers), faith organizations and other members of the Raise Montana Coalition.
MT Secured $6.4 million state funding for "Indian Education for All" program, allowing the state to begin to meet the Montana Constitution requirement that all public school students learn about Native American culture and history. $6,400,000       X     Native Americans Montana Indian Education Association, Office of Public Instruction, MEA-MFT (Montana Education Association and the Montana Federation of Teachers), Montana Human Rights Network, and Montana Quality Education Coalition.
MT Convinced state to adopt water standards for several rivers, giving irrigators and other water users the power to challenge coal bed methane pollution in court.       X       Rural residents Northern Plains Resource Council, Tongue and Yellowstone Irrigation District, Tongue River Water Users Association, Buffalo Rapids Irrigation District.
MT Prevented a coal bed methane company from acquiring a water right to discharge its water, thus averting water privatization.       X       Rural residents Northern Plains Resource Council, Tongue and Yellowstone Irrigation District, Tongue River Water Users Association
MT Prevented passage of anti-reproductive choice bills and ballot measures.           X X Women Montana Women Vote and member organizations NARAL, Planned Parenthood, Blue Mountain Clinic and Bridger Clinic.
NC Campaign to improve conditions for immigrants included work on statewide enforcement of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, education access, and local law enforcement cooperating with ICE. Improved access to public agencies (e.g. interpretation, translation).             X Immigrants Center for Participatory Change, COLA (Coalición de Organizaciones Latino-Americanas), NC Justice Center, National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights
NC Won increase in AIDS Drug Assistance Program of $2 million per year and expanded eligibility. Benefit estimated for four years. $8,000,000         X   Individuals with HIV/AIDS EqualityNC
NC Won basic hospital visitation rights for 20,000 same-sex partners as part of NC Patients' Bill of Rights; also benefits all unmarried couples in state.             X LGBTQ individuals Equality NC
NC Defeated annually a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage in the state. At publication time, NC remains the only southern state without such a ban, but the issue arises every year. Protects rights of 20,000 same sex-couples.             X LGBTQ individuals Equality NC, ACLU, NC Council of Churches
NC House passed School Violence Prevention Act with LGBTQ- inclusive language - the first time any state statute has done so. Law subsequently enacted in June, 2009.             X LGBTQ youth Equality NC, Covenant with NC's Children, NC Association of Educators, the Arc of NC, ACLU- NC, NASW-NC (National Association of Social Workers - North Carolina)
NC Presented data on job loss and rural poverty to Congressional Rural Caucus and secured sections on entrepreneurship and local food systems in the 2008 Farm Bill. Impact affects 1,200 low-income residents.   X           Rural residents; low-income community residents Center for Community Action (CCA), Robeson County Board of Commissioners, UNC-Pembroke
NC NC Health Services Commission passed a regulation for playground equipment to eliminate exposure to arsenic-treated wood. Regulation protects 269,000 child care-aged children statewide.       X   X   Low-income children and youth Toxic Free NC
NC Durham/Orange Public Schools adopted Integrated Pest Management in 2005, saving over $100,000 since implementation. The School Children's Health Act passed in 2006, mandating IPM in all NC public schools by 2011. Estimate includes DPS savings and one year of fully implemented IPM at the state level. Health Impact affects $1.45 million public school students. $313,450     X X X   Low-income children and youth Toxic Free NC, NC Pediatric Society, Conservation Council of NC, Action for Children NC, Covenant with NC's Children
NC In 2004, the State Supreme Court upheld the Leandro v. State of North Carolina decision affirming that all children have a constitutional right to a sound basic education. This led to funding restructuring and increased funding statewide for the disadvantaged student supplemental fund, including $25 million for Robeson County Public Schools since 2004. Public school system reaches 20,000 (k-12) students. $25,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth Center for Community Action, NC Justice Center, Public Schools of Robeson County
NC Worked with Winston-Salem Public Schools to ensure proposed bond measure included funding for rehabilitation and replacement of older school buildings, nearly tripling the value of the originally proposed bond. Public school system services 36,000 (k-12) students. $170,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth CHANGE (Communities Helping All Neighbors Gain Empowerment), Community Alliance for Education, NAACP, Ministers Conference of Winston-Salem and Vicinity, Winston-Salem/Forsyth County PTA Council, Urban League
NC Increased enrollment in Supplemental Education Services Program, a free federal program for struggling school districts. Estimate includes enrollment through 2010. School system impact affects 7,300 (k-12) students. $13,317,390       X     Low-income children and youth HELP (Helping Empower Local People)
NC Revived Mayor's Youth Jobs program, providing 1,500 youth job training slots and 250 summer jobs. Benefit includes funding for training programs and funding for employment in 2008. $711,000 X     X     Low-income children and youth HELP (Helping Empower Local People), Goodwill Industries
NC Secured funding for summer youth jobs program, which has provided approximately 900 local youth with summer jobs since 2004. $227,000 X     X     Low-income children and youth CHANGE (Communities Helping All Neighbors Gain Empowerment), Winston-Salem Urban League, Winston-Salem City Council
NC Created N. Charlotte Youth Network - an evening and weekend program for 500 local youth; dollar estimate includes value of police officers' donated time and in-kind donations from member congregations. $50,000       X     Low-income children and youth HELP (Helping Empower Local People), Charlotte Mecklenberg Police Department
NC Helped create and has leveraged $1.3 million in funding for Learning Together Family Literacy Program since 2003. Impact of program reaches 2,000 children and caregivers $1,300,000       X     Low-income children and youth; childcare providers Center for Community Action (CCA), Robeson County Family Support
NC Following the Leandro decision, CCA worked to create a countywide Commission on a Sound Basic Education to identify areas of needed reform and strategies for achieving equity in rural Robeson County. Reforms would affect 20,000 public school students in Robeson County.         X     Low-income children and youth; rural residents Center for Community Action, Public Schools of Robeson County, NC Justice Center, Rural School and Community Trust
NC CHANGE (Communities Helping All Neighbors Gain Empowerment) got City to address up to 1,000 identified problems such as potholes, abandoned cars and speeding. Actual value of repairs and improvements could not be estimated but were likely much higher. $8,000   X         Low-income community residents CHANGE (Communities Helping All Neighbors Gain Empowerment)
NC Won an EPA grant to install a sewage line after finding backed up wastewater in the majority of community homes. Installation affects 176 residents of Tillery, NC.       X   X   Low-income community residents Concerned Citizens of Tillery, NC Environmental Justice Network, UNC-Chapel Hill
NC Won $51.2 million in appropriations to the state's housing trust fund, which has constructed hundreds of units and provided thousands of jobs. The quantitative value includes NC Housing Finance Agency estimates of increased state and local tax revenues and construction spending. Impact reaches 20,000 lower-income households. $327,032,343   X         Low-income community residents Campaign for Housing Carolina coalition included NC Housing Coalition, NC Justice Center, United Way of NC, Arc of NC, NC Bankers Association, AARP, NC Coalition to End Homelessness, and others.
NC Enacted state Earned Income Tax Credit, a refundable state credit available at 3.5 percent of the federal EITC (increased to 5% in 2009). State estimates of tax refunds and reduced liability were projected for two tax years. Tax credit will affect 845,000 low-income workers. $118,000,000 X           Low-income community residents NC Justice Center, AARP, ARC (Appalachian Regional Commission), NAACP, NCAE (North Carolina Association of Educators), AFL-CIO, and dozens of others.
NC Helped organize 53 residents of Burnsville Land Community to convert their mobile home park into a community land trust and purchase the land. $300,000   X         Low-income community residents Center for Participatory Change, Community Reinvestment Association of NC, NC Housing Coalition
NC Supported the development of community-based agriculture, which led to access to organic produce for 150 residents of public housing across Western NC. $4,000 X       X   Low-income community residents CPC (Center for Participatory Change), Pisgah View Peace Garden, Shiloh Community Association, Blue Ridge Women in Agriculture, Smoky Mountain Native Plants Assoc., Bakersville Community Market
NC Worked with the City of Durham to raise public and private funding for child-care subsidies for lower-income workers. Impact reached 600 children. $1,200,000 X           Low-income community residents Durham CAN (Congregations, Associations and Neighborhoods), Durham Department of Social Services
NC Compelled Brenntag chemical company to change its dumping practices, make repairs and apply for NPDES (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) permit to control pollution discharge harming a stream near public housing complex. Impact affects 350 lower-income families. $1,000,000     X   X   Low-income community residents Durham CAN (Congregations, Associations and Neighborhoods), McDougald Terrace Residents Council
NC Convinced Durham Department of Health to seek federal funding for lead testing in targeted homes, resulting in the leveraging of federal funds. Testing impacts 2,000 low-income families $2,000,000         X   Low-income community residents Durham CAN (Congregations, Associations, Neighborhoods), Duke Children's Environmental Health Initiative, SIHA, Durham Public Schools, Department of Health
NC Residents won repairs for longstanding problems of pest infestation, high utility bills with no heat, and other maintenance issues. The apartments are now under new management; residents were connected to Section 8 vouchers and an IDA program to build assets.     X         Low-income community residents Neighbors for Better Neighborhoods, CHANGE (Communities Helping All Neighbors Gain Empowerment)
NC Residents invited the mayor and other city officials to tour the neighborhood, long plagued by mold, pests, and other problems. The city then inspected a sample of public housing and found similar problems; the Mayor created a task force addressing the minimum housing code.     X         Low-income community residents Neighbors for Better Neighborhoods, CHANGE (Communities Helping All Neighbors Gain Empowerment)
NC Won a series of improved protections for 136,000 residents of mobile homes in parks: changed property guidelines so that mobile homeowners qualify for federal mortgage assistance; increased notification for sale of park land from 30 to 180 days; passed tax credit for park owners who sell the land to tenants as a cooperative.     X         Low-income community residents NC Housing Coalition, NC Justice Center, Legal Aid NC
NC Secured temporary housing assistance funds for 500 Hurricane Katrina survivors residing in Charlotte. $1,000,000   X         Low-income community residents; victims of natural disasters HELP (Helping Empower Local People), Project TASK (Transitional Support for Survivors of Katrina)
NC Enacted Home Protection program, providing one-time loans Agency to unemployed homeowners and counseling to hundreds of others. Estimate includes appropriations, value of saved property and value of loans. In total, 4,000 homeowners are affected by these changes. $59,400,000 X X         Low-income homeowners NC Housing Coalition, NC Housing Finance Agency
NC Health care providers must now report suspected pesticide illnesses and injuries. Estimated value includes continuous funding for an epidemiologist and one-time allocation to implement the rule. Changes impact 100,000 farmworkers. $354,000     X   X   Low-wage farmworkers Toxic Free NC, Farmworker Advocacy Network, NC Division of Public Health and others.
NC Amended NC Migrant Housing Act to improve inspection practices of NC Department of Labor, require farmers to provide clean, sanitary mattresses for farmworkers and require NC DOL to conduct a feasibility study on providing low-cost financing for construction and rehabilitation of migrant farmworker housing. Secured $124,000 annual recurring funding for two new migrant housing inspectors. Impacts affect 100,000 farmworkers. $496,000   X       X Low-wage farmworkers Farmworker Advocacy Network: Alianza-UNC, East Coast Migrant Head Start Project, El Pueblo, Inc., Episcopal Farmworker Ministry, Farm Labor Organizing Committee, Farmworker Unit of Legal Aid of NC, National Farm Worker Ministry, NC Community Health Center Association, NC Farmworkers Project, NC Farmworker Health Program, NC Justice Center, NC Latino Coalition, Toxic Free NC, Student Action with Farmworkers, Telamon Corp., Western NC Workers Center.
NC Introduced Agricultural Family Protection Act, which partially passed: it prohibits retaliation against farmworkers reporting pesticide violation and strengthens farm record keeping of pesticide application. Act protects 100,000 farmworkers.       X   X X Low-wage farmworkers Student Action with Farmworkers, NC Justice Center, El Pueblo, Farmworker Advocacy Network
NC Successful living wage campaigns at the City of Durham and County of Durham paved the way for successes at Durham Public Schools and Duke University. New wages were estimated for City, County and DPS through 2010. Impact affects 100 low-wage workers. $1,385,443 X           Low-wage workers Durham CAN (Congregations, Associations, Neighborhoods)
NC State assembly increased minimum wage from $5.15 per hour to $6.15 per hour. Wage estimates are projected for four years for minimum wage workers and those just above the minimum. Impact affects 139,000 low-wage workers $834,000,000 X           Low-wage workers North Carolinians for Fair Wages coalition included NC Justice Center, NC Council of Churches, NC AFL-CIO, Covenant with North Carolina's Children, NAACP, NC Fair Share, ACORN, Institute for Southern Studies and others.
NC Enacted unemployment insurance reform and modernization; increased benefits since 2004 ($30,263,019) and allowed state to qualify for additional $200 million federal stimulus funds in 2009. Impact affects roughly 6,000 workers $230,263,019 X           Low-wage workers NC Justice Center, AFL-CIO, Coalition Against Domestic Violence, NC NOW (National Organization for Women), NC Council of Churches, NC Fair Share, State Association of Community Development Corporations, and others.
NC Established Poverty Reduction and Economic Recovery Legislative Study Commission to address rapidly rising poverty rates in rural areas of the state. The state assembly allocated $100,000 for the Commission in 2008. $100,000 X           Rural residents Center for Community Action, Robeson County Board of Commissioners, State Representative Garland Pierce
NC Supported the development of four worker-owned cooperatives providing stable employment for 25 members in rural Western NC. The cooperatives are projecting total income as high as $300,000 for 2009. $104,902 X           Rural residents Center for Participatory Change (CPC), Mountain BizWorks, Ownership Appalachia
NC Won statewide ban on new or expanded lagoon and sprayfield technology used by Industrial Livestock Operations (ILOs) in rural communities. Ban positively impacts 990,000 rural residents.       X       Rural residents Concerned Citizens of Tillery, NC Environmental Justice Network, UNC-Chapel Hill, Environmental Defense, Southern Environmental Law Center, and others
NC Defeated proposal to roll back required buffer zone for aerial crop spraying, preventing pesticides from being sprayed on rural schools, businesses and homes. Buffer zone protects 5,000 rural residents.       X   X   Rural residents Toxic Free NC, Conservation Council of NC, Student Action with Farmworkers, Carolina Farm Stewardship Association
NC Won one-year statewide moratorium on new landfill construction, which benefits $9 million NC residents.       X       Rural residents Concerned Citizens of Tillery, Citizens for a Safe and Vibrant Community, Green County Citizens for the Environment, UNC-Chapel Hill Public Health
NC Secured funding for Prescription Drug Assistance Program in the state, providing supplemental funding for 5,325 senior citizens on Medicaid through NCRx and ChecKmeds. $8,000,000         X   Senior citizens Advocates for a NC Prescription Drug Assistance Program, Senior PharmAssist, and others.
NC Secured state grants for Senior Health Insurance Information Program to connect 500 eligible residents to NCRx and ChecKmeds. $250,000         X   Senior citizens Advocates for a NC Prescription Drug Assistance Program, Senior PharmAssist, and others.
NC Initiated Project Access, which provides donated specialty healthcare services for 1,400 lower-income patients who otherwise would use the emergency room for their needs beyond primary care. $3,000,000         X   Low-income community residents Durham CAN (Congregations, Associations, Neighborhoods), Partnership for a Healthy Durham, Project Access
NC Secured continued funding for Winston-Salem's Downtown Health Plaza, where 50,000 uninsured residents receive free or reduced-cost health services. $1,500,000         X   Low-income community residents CHANGE (Communities Helping All Neighbors Gain Empowerment)
NM Secured state legislation allowing undocumented immigrant students to pay in-state tuition and obtain state financial aid. Defeated legislative attempts to repeal this act in 2006. Conservative estimates are that 500 students are benefiting from an average of $5,000 per year for tuition for at least a two-year period. $5,000,000       X   X Immigrants Somos Un Pueblo Unido
NM Secured state executive order that prohibits state and local law enforcement from questioning crime victims, witnesses, and other non-criminal immigrants about their immigration status. Changes protect 75,000 immigrants.             X Immigrants Somos Un Pueblo Unido, ACLU, Enlace Communitario (leads), Santa Fe police chief Beverly Lennen
NM Secured municipal resolution in Albuquerque City Council stating that municipal funds cannot be used to enforce federal immigration laws. Therefore the local police cannot do the job of ICE and detain individuals solely for immigration-related issues. Resolution protects rights of 50,000 immigrants.             X Immigrants Enlace Comunitario, with support from ACORN, NM Conference of Churches, Archdiocese of NM, NM Coalition Against Domestic Violence, ACLU, NM Federation of Labor, SWOP (SouthWest Organizing Project)
NM Worked with the Albuquerque Police Department to revise its standard operating procedure to reflect the municipal resolution regarding enforcement of federal immigration laws. This ensures that new police recruits are properly trained to follow the law. Resolution's implementation protects rights of 50,000 immigrants.             X Immigrants El Centro de Igualdad y Derechos; MALDEF (Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund), ACLU, City Council, CHP, NM Coalition Against Domestic Violence, NM Conference of Churches, NM Center on Law and Poverty
NM In Santa Fe, organized efforts to standardize local jail policies regarding federal Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) holds; rewrote policies and trained police regarding non-discrimination policy and ICE holds. Changes impact 17,000 immigrants.             X Immigrants Somos Un Pueblo Unido
NM Secured state law granting driver’s licenses to drivers regardless of their immigration status. Defeated attempts to repeal the law in 2005-2006 and defeated the governor’s proposal to fingerprint undocumented driver’s license applicants in 2006. The Motor Vehicle Department estimates up to 50,000 drivers have obtained licenses, generating at least $900,000 in revenue for the state. $900,000           X Immigrants Alliance for a Safer New Mexico -- Somos Un Pueblo Unido convened and Enlace Comunitario co-led; included Archdiocese of NM, NM Conference of Churches, ACORN, NM Coalition Against Domestic Violence, NM Federation of Labor and others
NM Defeated state legislation that would have implemented federal REAL ID Act requirements. Legislators estimated that it would cost the state at least $37 million to comply with the federal law. $37,000,000           X Immigrants Somos Un Pueblo Unido, El Centro de Igualdad y Derechos, ACLU. Other supporters included NM ACORN, NM Coalition to End Homelessness, NM Voices for Children
NM In response to firing of school district workers, passed Santa Fe city council resolutions regarding Social Security Administration no-match letters, affirming that the City will not illegally fire its employees simply due to receipt of a Social Security no-match letter. Protects 17,000 district employees.             X Immigrants; low-wage workers Somos Un Pueblo Unido, unions
NM Improved language access at Department of Children Youth & Families (child welfare agency) by creating a task force and working with the agency to provide interpreters at each office, provide forms in Spanish, post signs in other languages offering interpreter services, and otherwise making the offices more accessible and welcoming to limited-English speakers, including Spanish, Vietnamese, and Navajo speakers.   X         X Immigrants; Native Americans Enlace Comunitario, NM Center on Law and Poverty
NM Improved interpretation and translation services and removed financial barriers for un/under-insured clients at University of New Mexico Hospital. Secured pilot training program for medical interpreters at UNMH. Services and changes affect some 105,200 individuals.           X X Immigrants; uninsured individuals Community Coalition for Healthcare Access, including Enlace Comunitario, El Centro de Igualdad y Derechos, NM Center on Law and Poverty, NM Voices for Children.
NM Decreased barriers at Department of Human Services for immigrant victims of domestic violence who were wrongly denied TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) benefits.   X         X Immigrants; victims of domestic violence Enlace Comunitario, NM Legal Aid, Catholic Charities, NM Center on Law and Poverty
NM Doubled state funding for school-based health centers to 2 million per year, adding $3 million in new funds over 3 years. $3,000,000       X X   Low-income children and youth NM Voices for Children; New Mexico Assembly for School-Based Health Care
NM "Passed an Albuquerque school bond for $144 million, which had previously failed, through intensive voter education and get-out-the-vote efforts. Impact of bond reaches 90,000 public school students. $144,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth Albuquerque Interfaith, Albuquerque Public Schools
NM Negotiated with Creative Educational Institute and Elev8 New Mexico initiative to provide learning lab programming for challenged learners in 20+ middle schools, and with program materials provided at one-quarter market cost. Programs impact hundreds of middle school students.         X     Low-income children and youth Community Action New Mexico
NM Secured passage of a state amendment that allowed for funds to develop tiered salary structure that greatly increased teachers’ salaries, totaling more than $84 million to date. Changes impact 18,400 teachers statewide. $84,448,600       X     Low-income children and youth Albuquerque Interfaith, teachers’ unions
NM Albuquerque City Council passed one-quarter cent tax, generating $26 million per year for public safety, youth and after school programs. Impact of funds reaches 20,000 youth citywide. $130,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth Albuquerque Interfaith, Albuquerque police and fire unions, bill sponsors
NM In 2005, youth helped defeat a proposed statewide youth curfew and, in 2007, youth succeeded in gaining “Equal Access” to the greater Albuquerque high schools, to provide students with information about alternatives to military recruitment.         X     Low-income children and youth SWOP (SouthWest Organizing Project)
NM In 2001, the state lowered the eligibility levels for child care subsidies from 200 percent to 100 percent of the Federal Poverty Level (FPL). Since then, eligibility rose from 100 percent to 165 percent of FPL, and in 2008 it was fully restored to 200 percent of FPL. Child care assistance rose by $13.5 million between 2003 and $2008. The state has allocated 1 million for a pilot home visiting program for first-born children. Impact of program and child care subsidies estimated to reach 22,000 children. $14,500,000 X           Low-income children and youth; childcare providers NM Voices for Children
NM Youth successfully advocated for $1.9 million increase in youth smoking prevention funds from the state, and they secured passage of Dee Johnson Clean Indoor Air Act. A new Native American youth suicide prevention program received 50,000, and 100,000 was appropriated to study racial disparities in health of NM youth. $2,050,000       X X   Low-income children and youth; Native Americans NM Voices for Children
NM Secured $11 million of infrastructure funding to remedy long- standing sewer and flooding issue in Martineztown section of Albuquerque. $11,000,000     X       Low-income community residents Albuquerque Interfaith
NM Negotiated a settlement with Helena Chemical Company, whose fertilizer plant was polluting the Mesquite community for more than a decade. Settlement affects 1,000 residents. $202,500     X   X   Low-income community residents NM Environmental Law Center, on behalf of Mesquite Community Action Committee
NM Increased funding in Albuquerque municipal budget for city employee salaries, youth programs, drug rehab programs, etc. $10,000,000 X     X     Low-income community residents Albuquerque Interfaith, social services agencies
NM Negotiated a settlement with Stericycle, concerning operation of medical waste treatment facility in Wells Park neighborhood of Albuquerque.       X       Low-income community residents NM Environmental Law Center, on behalf of Wells Park Neighborhood association, SWOP (SouthWest Organizing Project)
NM A referendum passed in Albuquerque amending the City Charter to allow public financing of municipal elections. Candidates for citywide office who collect 5 donations from at least 1 percent of registered voters in their district can access public funds to run for office.             X Low-income community residents SWOP (SouthWest Organizing Project), SAGE Council (Sacred Alliances for Grassroots Equality), National Indian Youth Council, Common Cause
NM City of Albuquerque inserted “clawback” provisions in its Industrial Revenue Bond (IRB) agreement with Phillips Semiconductor, which compelled the company to repay the city foregone tax revenue for failing to adhere to the provisions of the bond agreement. In 2003, Phillips closed its plant earlier than agreed and paid back $13.1 million. Those funds are being reinvested in municipal economic development strategies and expected to impact 518,000 residents of Albuquerque. $13,100,000 X X         Low-income community residents SouthWest Organizing Project (SWOP)
NM More than doubled annual State appropriation for homeless services from 300,000 to 750,000, for a total of 2.25 million over five years, reaching an estimated 20,000 homeless individuals. $2,250,000   X         Low-income community residents NM Coalition to End Homelessness
NM Enacted Working Families Tax Credit, a refundable state credit available to workers claiming the federal Earned Income Credit on their tax form, at eight percent of the federal EIC (increased to 10% in 2008). Based on how many taxpayers claim the federal EITC, estimate is $32.5 million in credits annually. Also increased the Personal Income Tax exemption for low-income families, estimated at $10.9 million in tax savings. These estimates were only projected for one year of tax filings but estimated to impact 200,000 filers. $43,380,000 X           Low-income community residents NM Voices for Children
NM Secured passage of State Affordable Housing Trust Fund and garnered several appropriations for the fund, totaling $15 million through 2008, which has leveraged an estimated $168 million in additional resources for affordable housing. These funds will be used to create 2,042 new housing units. $183,000,000   X         Low-income community residents Housing Trust Fund Coalition, convened by Human Needs Coordinating Council, with NM Coalition to End Homelessness, Community Action Agency of Southern NM, Lutheran Advocacy Ministry-NM, NM Conference of Churches, Bernalillo County Housing Authority, Enterprise Foundation, Homewise, Jubilee Housing, NM Mortgage Finance Authority, NM Voices for Children and others.
NM "Secured increases to the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) and the Weatherization Program totaling $1.5 million over five years, affecting 63,000 households in New Mexico." $1,500,000 X           Low-income community residents Community Action New Mexico, NM Voices for Children
NM Establishment of state Individual Development Account (IDA) program to help lower-income residents save money toward education, a small business, or other goals. Secured one-time state allocation of $1.5 million and annual appropriations of 250,000 that was increased to 500,000 in 2008. In addition, 414 IDAs estimated to generate $15.8 million in home loan financing, increase earnings potential from education by $1.1 million, and create 232 new jobs in small businesses. $19,150,000 X           Low-income community residents Community Action New Mexico (lead); NM Project for Financial Literacy, Tax HELP, NM Voices for Children
NM State Supreme Court ruled that New Mexico Environment Department must take into account community concerns and impacts on residents’ quality of life when making a decision about whether to issue a permit for a landfill. Decision impacts 6,000 residents of Chaparral and all other low-income communities at risk of landfill.       X   X   Low-income community residents NM Environmental Law Center, Colonias Development Council; South Valley Coalition of Neighborhood Associations; private attorney
NM Fought off attempts by mobile home park owner to convert property and cause residents to lose their homes. Property has yet to be redeveloped and developer has agreed to develop as mixed-income property.     X         Low-income community residents Albuquerque Interfaith
NM Got PNM gas and electric utility to commit more than $1.5 million per year in energy efficiency services to lower-income customers and intervened in PNM gas rate case to slash interest on late payments from 18% to 8%, with a prohibition of late fees for all lower-income customers. Further, PNM was prohibited from implementing a new rate structure that would force customers to pay extra to make up for lost revenues from energy efficiency measures. PNM has provided $782,000 in gas weatherization services and $484,000 in electric weatherization services for lower income customers to date. This combined amount was doubled to reflect ongoing commitment to provide these services. This conservative estimate does not include savings from interest rate reductions and prohibition of late fees for lower-income customers. PNM efforts affect all 490,000 PNM customers. $2,532,000 X           Low-income community residents Community Action New Mexico
NM State legislature passed winter utility disconnect moratorium; CANM (Community Action New Mexico) twice fought efforts to curtail the moratorium and has monitored implementation to ensure compliance by utilities, leading to investigations by the state regulator (PRC). Impact affects 200,000 households.   X           Low-income community residents Community Action New Mexico (CANM)
NM Governor Richardson signed Environmental Justice Executive Order.       X       Low-income community residents; people of color NM Environmental Law Center, Southwest Network for Environmental and Economic Justice (SNEEJ), NM Environment Department Environmental Justice Advisory Committee
NM The NM Environmental Improvement Board amended its regulations to provide significant protections for low-income communities and communities of color from the impacts of new solid waste facilities, such as landfills and incinerators. Protections affect 70,000 South Valley residents.       X   X   Low-income community residents; people of color SWOP (SouthWest Organizing Project), NM Environmental Law Center, South Valley Coalition of Neighborhood Associations, Environmental Justice Working Group, Environmental Justice Advisory Committee
NM State passed Home Loan Protection Act to curb predatory lending practices and protect consumers in the home loan market. Center for Responsible Lending estimated a savings in points and fees for borrowers of more than $130 million, and impacted 43,202 loans. $130,812,570   X         Low-income homeowners ACORN, AARP, United South Broadway Corporation, NM PIRG
NM Led effort to bring New Mexico’s Attorney General’s office and housing and legal aid groups together to develop a foreclosure prevention strategy in response to crisis. Strategy included public service announcements, radio shows, foreclosure prevention days, etc.     X         Low-income homeowners Community Action New Mexico
NM Santa Fe City Council enacted living wage ordinance setting minimum wage of $8.50/hour effective in 2004. Small businesses (25 employees or less) were exempted. State legislation to preempt City action was defeated prior to enactment and again in 2005. Court challenge to law in 2003-04 was unsuccessful. Proposed exemption for home health care companies and postponement of second-phase increase to $9.50 defeated in city council in 2005. Finally in 2007, small business exemption was eliminated and annual indexing was added, using base of $9.50/hour. Estimated new wages cover four years for minimum wage workers and those just above minimum. Estimated impact to affect 13,000 workers. $96,720,000 X           Low-wage workers Santa Fe Living Wage Network, Somos Un Pueblo Unido
NM Albuquerque City Council increased minimum wage to $7.50 hour, to be phased in over three years (2007 - 2009); comparable legislation was also passed by the County of Bernalillo. Wage estimates are projected for three years for minimum wage workers and those just above minimum. Wage increases will impact 58,000 low-wage workers. $160,860,000 X           Low-wage workers Albuquerque Living Wage Campaign included ACORN, AFSCME (American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees) Council 18, Aunt Babe’s Kitchen, Big John’s, Brightening Best Cleaning, CAD Drafting & Design, Central NM Central Labor Council, Chiropractic Care Center, David B. Starr Land Development, NM Conference of Churches, NM Federation of Education Employees, NM Martin Luther King State Commission, NM Voices for Children, Operating Engineers Local 953, United Food and Commercial Workers
NM State enacted minimum wage increase to $7.50/hour, to be phased in over two years, from 2008 to 2009. Wage estimates are projected for two years for minimum wage workers and those just above minimum. Impact will affect 161,000 low-wage workers. $250,740,000 X           Low-wage workers New Mexicans for a Fair Wage, including ACORN, Arc of NM, Community Action NM, Democracy for New Mexico, Enlace Communitario, Health Action NM, Lutheran Advocacy Ministry, NM Catholic Conference, NM Center on Law and Poverty, NM Conference of Churches, Human Needs Coordinating Council, NM Voices for Children, Santa Fe Living Wage Network, Somos Un Pueblo Unido, Southwest Organizing Project, other community organizations, and numerous labor unions.
NM Unemployment Insurance reform enacted at the state level, expanding eligibility to claim UI benefits and increasing the weekly benefit workers receive, including a new dependent child allowance. In 2007, these changes were made permanent. Estimated increased benefits of at least $15 million for 44,000 workers, at least $25 million in rate cuts for employers, and an economic ripple effect of $1.70 for every dollar of new benefits. $65,500,000 X           Low-wage workers Unemployment Insurance Reform Coalition, including New Mexico Voices for Children, Human Needs Coordinating Council, NM Federation of Labor, Lutheran Advocacy Ministry, NM Coalition Against Domestic Violence, and over 100 other groups.
NM Secured one-time budget allocation of 380,000 from City of Albuquerque for First Nations Community Health Source clinic to serve urban native Americans who were no longer able to be served by Indian Health Hospital. Clinic available to population of 40,000 native Americans citywide. $380,000         X   Native Americans SAGE Council (Sacred Alliances for Grassroots Equality), SWOP (SouthWest Organizing Project), National Indian Youth Council, Center for Civic Participation
NM State established an Off-Reservation Native American Health Care Commission and allocated $60,000 per year for three years to assess the health care needs of urban native Americans. Impact reaches 40,000 urban native Americans. $180,000         X   Native Americans SAGE Council (Sacred Alliances for Grassroots Equality), National Indian Youth Council, Bernalillo County Commission
NM Regained Picuris Pueblo indigenous lands that are historical source of clay for their pottery, after having been occupied for decades by several mining companies operating the largest mica mine west of the Mississippi River. Change impacts 300 Picuris Pueblo members.       X       Native Americans NM Environmental Law Center, on behalf of Picuris Pueblo; private attorneys
NM Helped the Pajarita Mesa community of 250 families, which paid its taxes but got no services in return, to organize to obtain infrastructure and basic services from Bernalillo County. After an eight-year campaign, Mesa families finally won a special use permit to construct a water transfer station. Impact of campaign affects 1,200 residents.       X       Native Americans SouthWest Organizing Project (SWOP)
NM Prevented the U. S. Bureau of Land Management from leasing lands sacred to Counselor Chapter members of Navajo Nation for proposed oil and gas drilling. Protection effort affects 1,000 residents of Counselor Chapter.       X       Native Americans NM Environmental Law Center, for Counselor Chapter of Navajo Nation
NM State implemented Medicaid Birthing Options Program, which allows women who receive Medicaid to give birth at home and in the care of a midwife.           X X Native Americans; low-income women Tewa Women United, NM Midwives Association, NM Chapter of the American College of Nurse Midwives and SALUD! Managed Care Organizations (MCOs).
NM In 2004, persuaded the state water quality division (WQCC) to lower its standard for the amount of allowable uranium in ground water from 5,000 milligrams per liter to 30 milligrams per liter. This standard was upheld by the State Court of Appeals in 2006. Changes affect 15,000 residents of Crownpoint, Church Rock and Mt. Taylor.       X   X   Native Americans; rural residents NM Environmental Law Center, Southwest Research and Information Center (SRIC), Eastern Navajo Dine ? Against Uranium Mining (ENDAUM), NM Environment Department
NM Navajo leadership passed the Diné Natural Resources Protection Act, which bans uranium mining in Navajo Indian Country. Ban protects 15,000 residents of Crownpoint, Chruch Rock and Mt. Taylor.       X       Native Americans; rural residents NM Environmental Law Center, Southwest Research and Information Center (SRIC), Eastern Navajo Dine ? Against Uranium Mining (ENDAUM)
NM The Laguna/Acoma school based health care student group successfully advocated for additional support for behavioral/mental health services in the school-based health center (SBHC) clinics, and Navajo youth in Tohajiilee secured state funding for a new building for their SBHC.         X X   Native Americans; users of mental health services; low income children and youth NM Voices for Children
NM In Santa Fe and then Espanola, worked with a multidisciplinary team of county agencies, tribes, service providers, law enforcement, and other stakeholders to develop consistent protocols, IT systems, and training to better support native women who are victims of violence. Also worked at the state level to improve policies and procedures related to victims’ services.           X X Native Americans; victims of domestic violence Tewa Women United
NM State enacted the strongest Surface Owner Protection Act in the country, protecting landowners who own the surface of their land but not the mineral rights.       X       Rural residents NM Environmental Law Center, NM Cattle-growers Association; Oil and Gas Accountability Project
NM In 2003, helped defeat an effort by Phelps Dodge mining company to pass state legislation exempting the company’s open pit copper mines from reclamation requirements. In 2006, secured posting of a $386 million bond for reclamation of the company’s Tyrone open pit copper mine. Benefits affect 30,000 state residents $386,000,000     X       Rural residents NM Environmental Law Center, on behalf of Gila Resources Information Project; Kuipers and Associates
NM State Court of Appeals upheld state action delinking state definition of surface waters from federal definition of ‘waters of the United States’ with respect to water protection rights. This allows water quality regulators to protect 40 percent of the state’s surface waters and impacts the 33,000 residents of Clovis, NM.       X       Rural residents NM Environmental Law Center, on behalf of Concerned Citizens for Clean Water of Clovis
NM In 2003, Acequias granted authority over water rights valued at as much as $5 billion (this figure not included in ROI). In 2005-07, state provided a total of $400,000 for training to understand and exercise their authority over water rights. State legislature passed $16 million in capital funding package for acequias in 2007. Impact affects 25,000 members of Acequias Association. $16,400,000     X       Rural residents NM Acequia Association
NM Persuaded New Mexico Supreme Court that ranchers do not have forage rights associated with their water rights. Therefore ranchers cannot use water rights as a basis to graze their cattle on federal public lands.       X       Rural residents NM Environmental Law Center, National Wildlife Federation, NM Wildlife Federation, NM Trout Unlimited
NM Forced cancellation of two air quality permits issued by state agency for open burning and open detonation of depleted uranium and other substances by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).       X   X   Rural residents NM Environmental Law Center, Tewa Women United, Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety, and Embudo Valley Environmental Monitoring Group
NM Got state to enforce water standards with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); lawsuit pending to hold LANL accountable.       X       Rural residents Tewa Women United, Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety
NM Secured funding for expansion of the State Children’s Health Insurance (SCHIP) eligibility to 300 percent of federal poverty level, premium assistance for children 0-5, expanded Medicaid prenatal care eligibility to 235 percent FPL, and increased Medicaid provider rate. Between 2003 and 2007, increased state and federal investments in Medicaid by $800 million. Changes impact 25,000 children and adults. $800,000,000         X   Low-income children and youth NM Voices for Children
NM Secured new annual state appropriation of 750,000 for permanent supportive housing for individuals with serious mental illness, totaling $1.5 million over two years. Impact expected to reach at least 150 individuals. $1,500,000   X     X   Users of mental health services NM Coalition to End Homelessness
OR Defeated two anti-immigrant ballot measures in Columbia County, one at the ballot and the other in the courts after the voters passed it. Measure 5-190 proposed a 10,000 fine on any business found to be employing undocumented workers. Measure 5-191 proposed that 4 x 8-foot signs be posted at every construction site stating “Legal Workers Only” and the contact number for the Department of Homeland Security.             X Immigrants CAUSA, Rural Organizing Project, Basic Rights Oregon, Western States Center, Our Oregon
OR Defeated anti-immigrant ballot measure that would have severely limited English as a Second Language (ESL) in Oregon.         X   X Immigrants Center for Intercultural Organizing, many other organizations
OR Won a Portland citywide resolution to protect immigrant and refugee rights, promote their inclusion in public life and improve government services. This led to permanent funding for diversity and civic leadership pro- grams, which will receive at least $1.8 million in funding through 2012, and establishment of Newcomer Portland, a program in the Office of Human Relations that will receive a total of 490,270 in funding through 2012. $2,343,590           X Immigrants Center for Intercultural Organizing and 65 coalition partners
OR Successfully urged the state to adopt a federal option to extend access to Medicaid and State Children’s Health Insurance Program to legal immigrant and refugee children who have been in the country for less than five years.           X X Immigrants Center for Intercultural Organizing, People of Color Coalition
OR Prevented implementation of the REAL ID Act in Oregon, which would have cost the state at least $20 million to implement. $20,000,000           X Immigrants CAUSA, PCUN (Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste), Oregon's Farmworker Union, Speaker of the House
OR Successfully urged Multnomah County and the City of Eugene to reform their hiring practices by removing from job applications the question about conviction history and developing a clear and consistent approach to determining the relevance of such histories when they are considered.   X         X Incarcerated-formerly individuals Partnership for Safety and Justice
OR Secured Wasco County antidiscrimination ordinance with protections for LGBTQ residents.             X LGBTQ Individuals Rural Organizing Project, Basic Rights Oregon
OR Won passage of the Oregon Family Fairness Act, a statewide policy to create domestic partnerships, which grant to same-sex couples all the rights, benefits and responsibilities that are granted to opposite sex couples under state law. According to the Williams Institute, Oregon will save at least $3.6 million. Act affects more than 3,500 same-sex couples $3,672,892           X LGBTQ individuals Basic Rights Oregon, Basic Rights Education Fund, and dozens of organizations and legislators
OR Won passage of the 2007 Oregon Equality Act, a statewide policy to ban discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression in employment, housing, public accommodations, education and public services. Successfully defended the nondiscrimination and domestic partnership laws from going to the ballot for repeal in 2008. This defensive victory was won by challenging the petition gathering process and by defending the results of this process in federal court. Actions impact more than 153,000 LGBTQ residents.             X LGBTQ individuals Basic Rights Oregon and dozens of other organizations and legislators
OR Won additional state funding of $39 million per biennium to expand Oregon Head Start Prekindergarten to serve 3,200 additional children age 3-5 and their families. $74,490,000       X     Low-income children and youth Children's Institute, Ready for School campaign, business organizations, teachers and school employee unions and other children/education advocates.
OR Worked with the governor and state legislature to secure close to $1 million in first time funding for Early Head Start. Program affects 60 children. $910,000       X     Low-income children and youth Children's Institute, Ready for School campaign, business organizations, teachers and school employee unions and other children/education advocates.
OR Won the Safe Schools For All Youth Act to strengthen and enhance Oregon's anti-bullying policy for K-12 public education. Act impacts more than 300,000 students who experience bullying.         X     Low-income children and youth Basic Rights Oregon, and a coalition of 40 local and state-based organizations, including Oregon Student Association, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon, Center for Intercultural Organizing, Urban League, Stand for Children and Family Action Coalition Team
OR Released a report identifying weaknesses with Oregon's kindergarten readiness survey and worked with Department of Education to reform the school readiness assessment.         X     Low-income children and youth Children's Institute, Department of Education, and the Leaders Roundtable, a coalition of business, civic and government leaders in the Portland metropolitan area.
OR Secured resolution by Multnomah County Commission to keep youth in the juvenile justice system and prevent them from being held in adult jails, so that they are less likely to be physically harmed and less likely to be repeat offenders.         X   X Low-income children and youth Partnership for Safety and Justice
OR In response to report on need for professional development in early education, Education and Quality Investment Partnership (EQUIP), a public-private partnership to improve the quality of child care in Oregon, was launched and received $2.9 million in federal stimulus funds and $200,000 from the Oregon Community Foundation. Partnership affects 7,000 teachers and caregivers and up to 68,000 children. $3,100,000       X     Low-income children and youth; childcare providers and teachers Public-private partnership including State Child Care Division, Department of Human Services, Department of Education, The Oregon Community Foundation, Commission on Child Care, Children’s Institute and many others.
OR Won a dedicated set-aside of 30 percent of Portland urban renewal funding for affordable housing, which has contributed at least $125.5 million to affordable housing programs since 2005. Funding changes affect estimated 670,000 tenants. $125,500,000   X         Low-income community residents Community Alliance of Tenants, Affordable Housing NOW! Campaign
OR Secured passage of the Housing Opportunity Bill, which created a source of funding for affordable housing through a real estate document recording fee. An estimated $15 million will be generated during the 2009–2011 biennium and an additional $7.5 million is projected for 2012. Changes affect $1.15 million tenants. $22,500,000   X         Low-income community residents Community Alliance of Tenants, Oregon Housing Alliance
OR Successfully urged the state to adopt 60-day no-cause termination notice for month-to-month tenancies, doubling the amount of time many tenants have to find new housing. Policy change affects an estimated $1 million tenants.     X         Low-income community residents Community Alliance of Tenants, state legislators, Landlord-Tenant Law Coalition
OR Secured the adoption of rental housing inspection codes in Gresham and Multnomah counties, which enforce habitability requirements related to conditions such as mold, roaches and lead paint that affect household health. Changes in code expected to impact 670,000 tenants.     X         Low-income community residents Community Alliance of Tenants, Multnomah County Environmental Health Department
OR Secured state law protecting tenants during condominium conversions and allowing some tenants more notice and access to relocation assistance from displacement.     X         Low-income community residents Community Alliance of Tenants, Oregon Housing Alliance, state legislators
OR Aided the passage of Measure 57 and the defeat of Measure 61, saving the state $1.1 billion in prison construction costs, not counting interest payments, and $361 million in operating costs through 2012. Directed state resources to drug treatment and other services. $1,461,000,000           X Low-income community residents Partnership for Safety and Justice, Safety and Justice Action Fund, Rural Organizing Project, Basic Rights Oregon, SEIU, AFSCME (American Federation of State, County & Municipal Employees) and other members of the Better Way to Fight Crime Committee
OR Won passage of the Safety and Savings Omnibus bill, which resulted in $49.7 million in savings due to reduced need for prison beds. $49,700,000           X Low-income community residents Partnership for Safety and Justice
OR Won passage of ballot measures to increase corporate income taxes and increase the marginal tax rate on the wealthiest taxpayers. These measures will generate an additional $727 million for the state in just one biennium. $727,000,000 X           Low-income community residents Rural Organizing Project, members of Our Oregon coalition
OR Helped preserve cost of living adjustment for Oregon's minimum wage against bills calling for its elimination. This ensured that wages rose according to inflation rates. The Oregon minimum wage rose from $7.25 to $8.40 between 2005 and 2009 and is the second highest in the nation. Victories affect the thousands low-income workers in the state.   X           Low-wage workers CAUSA, Oregon Public Policy Center, United Labor Lobby
OR After a series of listening sessions on racial profiling by law enforcement, the Portland City Council established a Racial Profiling Commission and accepted other recommendations from the sessions.             X People of color Center for Intercultural Organizing, Oregon Action, Northwest Constitutional Rights Center.
OR Protected the Oregon Domestic and Sexual Violence Services Fund from spending cuts and increased funding by $4.28 million in two legislative sessions. $4,280,000         X   Victims of domestic violence Partnership for Safety and Justice, Oregon Law Center, Oregon Alliance to End Violence Against Women
PA Prevented the deportation of Philadelphian Jiang Xing after she had been hospitalized for a second-trimester miscarriage following inhumane treatment during a deportation attempt, including being denied adequate food and medical attention. This raised the broader issue of the need for humane immigration policy and awareness surrounding the inhumane nature of the criminalization of undocumented immigrants.           X X Immigrants Asian Americans United and Hoyu Association of Philadelphia
PA Convinced Allegheny County officials to break an existing food contract on the basis of providing inadequate nutrition for pregnant, incarcerated women and to adopt a new food contract that would provide sufficient nutrition. This change affects an estimated 60 women and infants annually.           X   Incarcerated women Lydia’s Place, Women and Girls Foundation and Allegheny County Jail Warden
PA Ended local sheriff’s policy of shackling pregnant incarcerated women during childbirth at Allegheny County Jail. Policy affects an estimated 60 women annually.           X X Incarcerated women Lydia’s Place, Women and Girls Foundation and Allegheny County Jail Warden
PA Convinced state Board of Pharmacy to allow over-the-counter sale of hypodermic needles and syringes, previously only available by prescription, a measure that improves access to clean needles for intravenous drug users and reduces the spread of HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C. Change will impact more than 2,000 intravenous drug-users.           X   Individuals using intravenous drugs AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvanians for the Deregulation of Syringe Sales, Prevention Point Pittsburgh, Southwest Pennsylvania AIDS Planning Commission, National Association of Social Workers and more than one dozen other coalition members.
PA Won protection for end-of-life medical care for persons with disabilities, ensuring equal access to life- sustaining treatment and patient involvement in medical decision-making. These changes affect $1.2 million people in PA who have disabilities.           X   Individuals with disabilities The Arc of PA, the Catholic Conference, Pennsylvania Bar Association and Pennsylvania Hospital Association
PA Enabled protective services laws providing recourse for vulnerable adults with disabilities between the ages of 18 and 59 who were at risk for abuse and neglect but not covered by existing protective services regulations. New protections affect the estimated 1,200 cases of abuse and neglect reported annually.           X X Individuals with disabilities The Arc of Pennsylvania and more than 80 organizations supportive of the law
PA Advocated for revisions to state Special Education Regulations as part of two-year state review of policies, resulting in changes based on input and experiences of chapter members, including regulations regarding classroom restraint. Changes impact 270,930 special education students state-wide.         X     Individuals with disabilities; low-income children and youth The Arc of Pennsylvania
PA Secured passage of Ashley’s Law, state legislation allowing students with disabilities who have an individual education program (IEP) to participate in their high school graduation ceremonies with their classmates and receive a certificate of attendance. Students who continue their IEP can receive a diploma at a later date. Changes impact 270,930 special education students state-wide.         X     Individuals with disabilities; low-income children and youth The Arc of Pennsylvania
PA Convinced an administrative judge to rule that the state Medicaid program should pay for the liver transplant of a person with HIV, which the program had initially denied based solely on his HIV status. This case set the precedent for future legal action for other people with HIV in need of an organ transplant and in PA affects the 18,500 people living with HIV/AIDS.           X X Individuals with HIV/AIDS AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania and Lambda Legal Defense Fund
PA Prevented the passage of a state law that would have required the perpetrators of certain sex offenses to submit to HIV testing upon the request of the survivor. The bill would have contributed to the stigma of HIV by furthering the assumption that alleged sex offenders have the virus and would not have provided any additional protection to the survivors of the crime. Preventing this passage affects the 18,500 individuals in PA that have HIV/AIDS.           X X Individuals with HIV/AIDS AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, ACLU of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania Coalition on Domestic Violence
PA Convinced Pennsylvania State Board of Cosmetology to end its exclusion of people with HIV from licensure, which was in violation of state and federal disability law. Change grants rights to the 18,500 individuals in PA that have HIV/AIDS.           X X Individuals with HIV/AIDS AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania
PA Prevented a change to the state HIV testing law that would have removed the requirement for informed consent, a change that would have decreased patient autonomy and removed people with HIV from involvement in their own medical decision-making. Prevented change protects the 18,500 individuals in PA that have HIV/AIDS.           X X Individuals with HIV/AIDS AIDS Law Project of Pennsylvania, Family Planning Council of Southeastern Pennsylvania and Women’s Law Project
PA Gained universal children’s health insurance statewide through Cover All Kids and expansion of State Children’s Health Insurance Program reauthorization. Dollar value includes amounts of appropriation increases and projected increases through 2012. Expanded coverage will affect 133,590 uninsured children. $183,100,000         X   Low-income children and youth Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, Public Citizens for Children and Youth, Pennsylvania Hospital Association, Pennsylvania Academy of Pediatrics and Cover All Kids coalition
PA Statewide passage of Pre-K Counts and childcare expansion. Dollar value includes actual appropriations through 2010 and projected appropriations through 2012. Changes will impact 11,800 low-income children annually. $417,631,940       X     Low-income children and youth Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, Public Citizens for Children and Youth and Pre-K Today coalition (1,600 members)
PA Convinced City of Philadelphia and Reading Company to clean up the vacant lot behind a neighborhood charter school and gained permission to turn the lot into a green space, providing students a place to learn about gardening and related science topics. Changes impact the 450 students at FACTS Charter School.       X X     Low-income children and youth Asian Americans United
PA Secured adoption of a new school funding formula statewide to address a $4.6 billion gap in adequate funding for public schools. Dollar value only includes actual amounts appropriated for the first three years, through 2010. Funding will impact $1.8 million public school students. $827,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, Good Schools Pennsylvania, Public Citizens for Children and Youth, Education and Policy Leadership Center, Education Law Center and Members of Pennsylvania School Funding Campaign
PA Passage of rigorous high school graduation requirements and related funding to improve college and career readiness. Dollar value reflects actual appropriations through 2010. New requirements will affect approximately 600,000 public high school students annually. $43,877,948       X     Low-income children and youth Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children, Pennsylvania Business Council and local Workforce Investment Boards
PA Secured funding to build Creative and Performing Arts school as part of the Kensington Community Mandate. Mandate impacts 1,600 students. $44,000,000       X     Low-income children and youth Youth United for Change
PA Convinced the School District of Philadelphia to improve access to test preparation opportunities for all students and limit test preparation activities to elective courses or non-instructional hours. Changes impact 170,000 students in Philadelphia Public Schools.         X     Low-income children and youth Youth United for Change
PA Conducted a “Right to Organize” campaign, asserting the right of youth to organize in the School District of Philadelphia and won acknowledgment of that right from district officials. Efforts impact 170,000 students in Philadelphia Public Schools.         X     Low-income children and youth Youth United for Change and American Civil Liberties Union
PA Secured availability of free public transportation for 25,000 Philadelphia high school students.       X X     Low-income children and youth Public Citizens for Children and Youth, Youth United for Change, Philadelphia Student Union and Community Legal Services
PA Increased local funding for School District of Philadelphia through transfer of real estate millage. Change impacts 170,000 students in Philadelphia Public Schools.         X     Low-income children and youth Public Citizens for Children and Youth, Philadelphia Student Union and Philadelphia Youth Network
PA Prevented Foxwoods Casino from moving from its originally planned site to a site in Chinatown, a change that would have introduced predatory gambling opportunities into a residential neighborhood. Impact protects 3,000 residents of Chinatown.       X       Low-income community residents Asian Americans United, Chinese Christian Church, Philadelphia Development Corporation, No Casino in the Heart of Our City and Casino Free Philadelphia
PA Passage of legislation creating a dedicated source of funding for the Philadelphia Housing Trust Fund for the preservation and creation of affordable housing. Dollar value includes actual amount allocated through 2010. Legislation impacts more than 4,000 low-income families. $57,450,000   X         Low-income community residents Women’s Community Revitalization Project, Philadelphia Association of Community Development Corporations and members of Philadelphia’s Affordable Housing Coalition
PA Successfully campaigned to convince the Allegheny County Health Department to re-open a WIC clinic in McKees Rocks, one of Pittsburgh’s lowest income neighborhoods, after the clinic had closed due to flood damage and remained closed due to budget issues. Re-opening provided access to 300 lower-income families.   X       X   Low-income community residents Just Harvest and Focus on Renewal
PA Facilitated improvements in Pennsylvania Department of Public Welfare customer relations, including voicemail for individual caseworkers and a new statewide call center. Improvements impact the 260,000 households in PA receiving SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) and cash assistance.   X           Low-income community residents Just Harvest, Community Legal Services and DPW (Department of Public Welfare) Income Maintenance Advisory Committee
PA Engage with state budget process on an annual basis to ensure preservation of programs, including services for people with disabilities and lower-income Pennsylvanians. The exact dollar value of this work cannot be calculated, but the organizations involved provide an invaluable platform for the state’s marginalized communities to ensure that their voices are included in the budget process.   X           Low-income community residents Consumer Health Coalition, The Arc of Pennsylvania, Just Harvest and Pennsylvania Partnerships for Children
PA Won a citywide plan in Philadelphia to allow lower-income homeowners facing a real estate tax sale of their properties to reduce their liability and make reasonable, income-based payments. This measure also required a bond insurer to offer similar plans to homeowners delinquent on taxes that the insurer had taken over.   X X         Low-income homeowners Philadelphia Unemployment Project and Community Legal Services
PA Facilitated the creation of the mandatory mortgage mediation program in Philadelphia, requiring due process for homeowners facing Sheriff’s Sales of their homes to enter counseling with their lenders and attempt to reach an agreement to prevent foreclosure. Program has prevented 1,200 Sheriff's Sales so far.     X         Low-income homeowners Philadelphia Unemployment Project and Community Legal Services
PA Raised state minimum wage by 2 per hour, from $5.15 to $7.15. Dollar value calculated using number of workers at or below minimum wage in 2004 and an estimated wage increase of $3,000 annually from 2007 to 2012. This conservative estimate does not include wage bumps for 410,000 workers earning between $5.15 and $7.15 per hour. Overall, wage increase affect 89,000 minimum-wage workers statewide. $1,602,000,000 X           Low-wage workers Philadelphia Unemployment Project, SEIU, Pennsylvania Council of Churches, Pennsylvania ACORN and Raise the Minimum Wage Coalition
PA Challenged petition for zoning special exception for a surface mine, which led to the denial of the permit – a first for the Fayette County Zoning Board. Protects the 150,000 rural residents who would have been affected by the exception.       X       Rural residents Mountain Watershed Association, Friends of Ohiopyle, Chestnut Ridge Trout Unlimited, Allegheny Trail Alliance, City of Connellsville, The Progress Fund and Fayette County Conservation District
PA Successfully listed Laurel Hill Creek on American Rivers’ Most Endangered River List, which contributed to the subsequent denial of a permit to withdraw water in that watershed. Impact affects the 2,500 rural residents living near watershed.       X       Rural residents Mountain Watershed Association, Chestnut Ridge Trout Unlimited and American Rivers
PA Challenged a permit application to create a deep mine in an area that had already been denied a permit in 1994, thus protecting delicate environmental resources including groundwater and fishing streams. Also affects the 9,800 rural residents living near potential mine site.       X       Rural residents Mountain Watershed Association
PA Increased personal care allowance for individuals living in personal care homes in Pennsylvania from $60 to $85 per month. Dollar value is calculated using increased amount ($300 annually per person) for an estimated 10,000 residents expected to benefit over three years. $9,000,000 X         X Users of mental health services Consumer Health Coalition, Pennsylvania Mental Health Consumers Association, Mental Health America and Three Rivers Center for Independent Living
WA Improved language access services and financial assistance at two local hospitals in Snohomish County, with a goal of building toward statewide improvements. Local hospitals each have spent as much as $150,000 or more to improve translated materials and signs, and to set up toll-free language interpretation lines. There are likely cost savings in terms of improved health outcomes because of the presence of an interpreter. Efforts reach estimated 70,000 limited-English speakers.           X   Immigrants Washington Community Action Network, interpreter associations and several legislative champions
WA Worked with governor and state legislature to develop Washington New Americans Program, which promotes successful immigrant integration by helping Legal Permanent Residents pursue citizenship and become active members of the community. State funding has totaled $862,000 since 2008, and federal and private grants added $163,250. Not included are $400,000 in pro bono legal services provided by lawyers over two years. Improvements estimated to impact 1,650 immigrants annually. $1,025,250           X Immigrants OneAmerica, with many allies
WA Defeated three anti-immigrant ballot initiatives. Similar measures filed in 2006 and 2007 (Nos. 946 and 966) would have required state and local government employees to verify identity and immigration status of every applicant for non-federally mandated public benefits, and report immigration violations, making failure to report a misdemeanor. Successes impact 800,000 immigrants state-wide.             X Immigrants Hate to Hope Coalition, including Community to Community Development, OneAmerica, the Church Council of Greater Seattle, and Washington Community Action Network
WA Washington New Americans Policy Council – New Americans Executive Order was signed by governor to improve integration of 800,000 immigrants across the state.             X Immigrants OneAmerica, with allies
WA Fended off anti-immigrant initiatives in the state legislature each year on a range of issues, including revoking the ability to procure driver's licenses for the undocumented, restricting access to benefits for immigrants and others. Successes impact 800,000 immigrants state-wide.             X Immigrants OneAmerica, other community-based organizations, labor unions, businesses, and state and local elected officials
WA In anticipation of $360 million school district renovations, worked with the Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency (SRCAA) to post violation histories of asbestos mitigation contractors on their website. Worked out a violation standard with school district representatives, which allowed contractors with one or two violations to bid on projects, with three violations to have a monitoring company verify compliance at the contractor's expense and with more than three violations within three years contractors could bid, but their bids were not accepted under the responsible contractor provision of state law.         X X   Low-income children and youth Spokane Alliance
WA Won passage of the Homeless Housing and Assistance Act in 2005 that established a document recording fee to fund homeless programs. Additional fees were established in 2007 and 2009. Total estimated funding generated from these fees is $176 million through 2012. Funding impacts 23,000 homeless individuals state-wide. $176,000,000   X         Low-income community residents Washington Low Income Housing Alliance, Washington State Coalition for the Homeless
WA Secured $300 million for the state Housing Trust Fund, which has leveraged additional housing funds at a rate of 4:1, bringing an estimated $1.2 billion more for affordable housing. Not included but also significant are the taxes generated at the state and local level and economic ripple effects of housing construction and related job creation. Changes impact an estimated 5,000 households. $1,500,000,000   X         Low-income community residents Washington Low Income Housing Alliance, Washington State Coalition for the Homeless, Seattle – King County Housing Development Consortium, Spokane Low Income Housing Consortium, Affordable Housing Consortium of Pierce County, Housing Consortium of Everett and Snohomish County
WA Won a 3 percent cost of living adjustment for TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) recipients, the first such increase in 15 years. Gains affect 56,457 families. $7,800,000 X           Low-income community residents Statewide Poverty Action Network, Speaker of the House Frank Chopp, coalition of welfare advocates
WA In 2005, helped pass state law to create Individual Development Account program. Since the 2006 start- up, $1.7 million in contracted state IDA funds have generated $1.8 million in federal and private funds that contribute to local projects. Impact of work reaches 512 account holders. $3,500,000 X           Low-income community residents Statewide Poverty Action Network, Representative Eric Pettigrew and Washington Asset Building Coalition
WA Won state legislation increasing protections for renters living in foreclosed properties, such as additional notice before the home is put up for sale, and before a new owner can evict an existing tenant.     X         Low-income community residents Washington Low Income Housing Alliance, Tenants Union of Washington State, Columbia Legal Services
WA In response to rising rates in the individual health insurance market of up to 43 percent every year, won a Rate Hike Accountability measure that gives the elected Insurance Commissioner greater authority to approve rate increases, which indirectly benefits all health insurance purchasers.           X   Low-income community residents Washington Community Action Network, broad coalition of health care advocates, faith leaders, and community organizations
WA Helped passage of the state's first law to rein in predatory payday lenders; includes reasonable repayment plan and limit on number of loans a person can have per year. According to the Center for Responsible Lending, payday lending volume is $1.5 billion a year in the state; $1.1 billion of that is from churning, or taking out new loans repeatedly. Total payday lending fees paid annually are $194.5 million.   X           Low-income community residents Statewide Poverty Action Network, APPL (Alliance to Prevent Predatory Lending) Coalition, Representative Sharon Nelson
WA Secured federal stimulus funds for statewide residential energy efficiency. The nonprofit Sustainable Works has garnered at least $1.3 million of those funds to create jobs and cut energy use by 30 percent for hundreds of Spokane homeowners. Not included are the cost savings to homeowners from reduced energy use. $1,300,000 X   X       Low-income homeowners Spokane Alliance
WA Passed several bills to prevent future abuses in subprime mortgage market: gave mortgage brokers fiduciary duty, banned kickbacks for high-cost loans, banned foreclosure rescue scams, likely saving home buyers thousands of dollars each in predatory costs and possible loss of their home.     X         Low-income homeowners Statewide Poverty Action Network, Alliance to Prevent Predatory Lending (APPL), which includes faith, labor, community organizations, former senator Brian Weinstein and representative Steve Kirby
WA Through several actions raised visibility of urban Indian issues in the state policy arena. Initiated Urban Indian Roundtable to provide platform for policy analysis and recommendations for issues affecting urban Indians. Participated on steering committees of "high cost of being poor" report and Racial Equity Report Card on state legislature. Efforts impact the 100,000+ off-reservation native Americans living in area.   X         X Native Americans Urban Indians of All Tribes Foundation, other organizations in the state
WA Sponsor of National Urban Indian Family Coalition, which has assembled a group representing 12 cities across the country engaging in unprecedented meetings with representatives from the President's Domestic Policy Council, White House Office on Urban Affairs, Housing and Urban Development, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Labor and other federal agencies to advance federal policy relating to off-reservation American Indian/Alaskan Native populations. Collective efforts affect $2.4 million off-reservation Native Americans.             X Native Americans Urban Indians of All Tribes Foundation, National Urban Indian Family Coalition, 23 other urban Indian groups
WA Won creation of Health Insurance Partnership (HIP) to provide state subsidies for low-income employees of small businesses. In October 2009, Washington State was awarded a five-year, $34.7 million federal grant from the State Health Access Program (SHAP), allowing the state to pick up where it left off when state funding was cut in January 2009, and finally implement the HIP, using 80 percent of the SHAP funding. HIP reach affects thousands of small business employees. $27,760,000         X   Small businesses Small Business for Secure Health Care Coalition, a project of Washington Community Action Network, Representative Eileen Cody, Healthy Washington Coalition
WA During conversion from nonprofit to for-profit hospital, got the State Health Department to require Community Health Systems to increase funding for indigent care (3.35 percent of budget) to just under twice the amount paid by the previous owner and to pay a minimum of $80 million to the community foundation created from the sale to continue the nonprofit mission of Empire Health Services. $80,000,000         X   Low-income community residents Spokane Alliance, VOICES coalition, Columbia Legal Services and Service Employees International Union
WA Protected funding for and prevented elimination of the Basic Health Plan, a fully state-funded, subsidized health insurance program for working families who do not qualify for Medicaid but can't afford private insurance. It covers every eligible resident in the state regardless of citizenship status. In 2009, the program was cut by 40 percent but advocates preserved the remaining $337.8 million. Currently the plan has 66,000 enrollees. $337,757,000         X   Low-income community residents Washington Community Action Network and more than 100 other organizations in a broad coalition
WA Helped create Washington Prescription Drug Card, a multistate purchasing pool that makes prescription drugs much more affordable, saving $12.2 million through June 2010. New program has 100,000 enrollees. $2,200,000         X   Low-income community residents Washington Community Action Network, health care advocates
WA Generated funding of administrative services and prescription drugs for Project Access, an organization providing free medical care to 130,000 working poor who have no health insurance.           X   Low-income community residents Spokane Alliance
  Total Monetary Benefits of Impacts $26,640,872,996



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